Courses of Study 2017-2018 
    
    Sep 28, 2020  
Courses of Study 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

AIIS—American Indian and Indigenous Studies

  

AKKAD—Akkadian

  
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    AKKAD 1410 - [Akkadian Language I: Code of Hammurabi]


    (CU-ITL)     
    Fall. Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with AKKAD 6410 .

    Staff.

    This course is a basic introduction to Akkadian, the language that dominated the writing of ancient Iraq for 2,500 years. It was the language of the empires of Babylonia and Assyria and the Epic of Gilgamesh. Students will become familiar with the basic grammar of Akkadian and will, by the end of the semester, be reading and translating the Code of Hammurabi in the original cuneiform script.

  
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    AKKAD 1411 - [Elementary Akkadian II: Historical and Literary Texts]


    (GHB) (LA-AS) (CU-ITL)     
    Spring. Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Prerequisite: AKKAD 1410 . Co-meets with AKKAD 6411 .

    J. Tenney.

    This course continues basic instruction in the Akkadian language by translating some of the most important documents of Ancient Iraq, such as Sargon’s Eighth Military Campaign, the Cyrus Cylinder, the Descent of Ishtar, and the Epic of Gilgamesh.

  
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    AKKAD 3412 - [Akkadian Language III: Archival, Political, and Economic Texts]


    (GHB) (LA-AS) (CU-ITL)     
    Fall. Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Prerequisite: AKKAD 1411  or permission of instructor. Co-meets with AKKAD 6412 .

    J. Tenney.

    This is an intermediate level Akkadian language class where students are required to read a selection of Akkadian texts in their original cuneiform. Coursework will build upon what has already been learned in introductory classes, and students are expected to show increased proficiency in reading the cuneiform script, articulating grammatical matters, and negotiating important reference works and dictionaries. Texts and readings vary by semester and can be adjusted to meet the learning outcomes of the student.

  
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    AKKAD 3414 - [Akkadian Language IV: Assyrian Language]


    (GHB) (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1. (CU-ITL)     
    Spring. Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Prerequisite: AKKAD 1411 AKKAD 3412 , previous Akkadian language instruction, or permission of instructor. Co-meets with AKKAD 6414 .

    J. Tenney.

    Assyrian is a dialect of the Akkadian language spoken and written in northern Mesopotamia from roughly 2000 to 600 B.C.  It is the language used by the traders of Karum Kanesh and the rulers of the Neo-Assyrian Empire.  There is no continuous linguistic record of Assyrian, but scholars have identified three significant dialects (Old, Middle, and Neo-Assyrian) during the two millennia that it was used.  The primary goal of this course is to analyze each of these dialects, the ways that Assyrian differs from the other major branch of Akkadian, Babylonian, and the manners in which the language and script changed over time.  Students are expected to show progress in reading cuneiform script and competence in utilizing reference materials.  We will read the Middle Assyrian Laws, harem edicts, Assyrian letters from Anatolia, a coronation ritual, omen queries to the sun god, letters from the Assyrian state department, and texts involving Urartu, the Levant, and Iran. (RS)

  
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    AKKAD 6410 - [Akkadian Language I: Code of Hammurabi]


    (CU-ITL)     
    Fall. Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with AKKAD 1410 .

    Staff.

    This course is a basic introduction to Akkadian, the language that dominated the writing of ancient Iraq for 2,500 years. It was the language of the empires of Babylonia and Assyria and the Epic of Gilgamesh. Students will become familiar with the basic grammar of Akkadian and will, by the end of the semester, be reading and translating the Code of Hammurabi in the original cuneiform script.

  
  •  

    AKKAD 6411 - [Elementary Akkadian II: Historical and Literary Texts]


    (CU-ITL)     
    Spring. Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with AKKAD 1411 .

    J. Tenney.

    This course continues basic instruction in the Akkadian language by translating some of the most important documents of Ancient Iraq, such as Sargon’s Eighth Military Campaign, the Cyrus Cylinder, the Descent of Ishtar, and the Epic of Gilgamesh.

  
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    AKKAD 6412 - [Akkadian III: Archival, Political, and Economic Texts]


    (CU-ITL)     
    Fall. Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: AKKAD 1411  or permission of instructor. Co-meets with AKKAD 3412 .

    J. Tenney.

    This is an intermediate level Akkadian language class where students are required to read a selection of Akkadian texts in their original cuneiform. Coursework will build upon what has already been learned in introductory classes, and students are expected to show increased proficiency in reading the cuneiform script, articulating grammatical matters, and negotiating important reference works and dictionaries. Texts and readings vary by semester and can be adjusted to meet the learning outcomes of the student.

  
  •  

    AKKAD 6414 - [Akkadian Language IV: Assyrian Language]


    (CU-ITL)     
    Spring. Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: AKKAD 6411 AKKAD 6412 , previous Akkadian language instruction, or permission of instructor. Co-meets with AKKAD 3414 .

    J. Tenney.

    Assyrian is a dialect of the Akkadian language spoken and written in northern Mesopotamia from roughly 2000 to 600 B.C.  It is the language used by the traders of Karum Kanesh and the rulers of the Neo-Assyrian Empire.  There is no continuous linguistic record of Assyrian, but scholars have identified three significant dialects (Old, Middle, and Neo-Assyrian) during the two millennia that it was used.  The primary goal of this course is to analyze each of these dialects, the ways that Assyrian differs from the other major branch of Akkadian, Babylonian, and the manners in which the language and script changed over time.  Students are expected to show progress in reading cuneiform script and competence in utilizing reference materials.  We will read the Middle Assyrian Laws, harem edicts, Assyrian letters from Anatolia, a coronation ritual, omen queries to the sun god, letters from the Assyrian state department, and texts involving Urartu, the Levant, and Iran.


ALS—Agriculture & Life Sciences

  
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    ALS 1140 - Explorations in Biology Research and Health Professions


         
    Summer. 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    Not for Biological Sciences majors.

    K. Gellman.

    Explores biology as it pertains to research, health-care professions, and the world at large. This seminar is designed for students with a strong interest in medicine and biological research. Discussions and laboratory exercises allow students to interact with faculty and guest speakers. Students learn to read and evaluate scientific publications on current biological topics. Course grade is based on several short papers.

    Outcome 1: Students learn to read and evaluate scientific publications on current biological topics.

  
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    ALS 1370 - Academic Communication for Multilingual Students


         
    Fall. 3 credits. S/U grades only (no audit).

    Permission of instructor required.

    M. Myers.

    The course introduces multilingual students to the academic expectations necessary for successful undergraduate careers at Cornell University. Students will research and write about a series of global issues (inequality, climate change, and food policy) as they consider their roles as international students in a dynamic, diverse academic environment. Students will acquire strategies for applying critical reading, writing, speaking, thinking, and language skills to both academic and global contexts. Practicing components of each skill area will enable students to develop a general foundation for oral and written communication as scholars and as global citizens.

    Outcome 1: Developing an understanding of:
    • critical thought and analysis in a global context
    • U.S. academic culture
    • university classroom expectations

    Outcome 2: Practical Skills and Techniques for:
    • developing strategies for reading, understanding, and interpreting scholarly texts
    • examining academic texts for rhetorical and structural language features
    • writing with theses, organization, arguments, evidence, and clear language
    • accurately citing source material
    • listening effectively to lectures and taking relevant notes
    • participating in class discussions
    • giving short academic presentations
    • revising and sharing work

  
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    ALS 1700 - Maximizing Individual Success


         
    Fall, spring (weeks 1-7). 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    L. Ryan, C. Thompson, D. Viands.

    Designed especially for new students, this course aids in transition to CALS and Cornell to improve academic success. Information and skills leading to increased engagement, help seeking behavior, support networks, teamwork, healthy living, resilience and strengths awareness will be emphasized. Through interactive activities, assignments, and a group project students will gain an awareness of academic and career resources to increase their self-awareness and the intersection to the world of work.

    Outcome 1: Students will incorporate the Work Day principle to create calendars as time management tools

    Outcome 2: Students will complete StrengthsQuest assessment to recognize and develop natural strengths while at Cornell and in future career.

    Outcome 3: Students will learn about networking and complete an informational interview with a faculty member.

    Outcome 4: Students will reflect on dealing with adversity, learn of campus resources, and create a personal support network.

    Outcome 5: Students will learn about, engage in activities and assignments and demonstrate how to ask questions, effective team participation, and respecting diversity.

    Outcome 6: Students will create a professional resume that reflects how they have demonstrated their strengths in past and current experiences.

    Outcome 7: Students will learn and demonstrate principles of healthy living.

    Outcome 8: Students will ascertain the benefit of reflection to promote continuous learning through the use of regular journaling assignments throughout the course.

  
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    ALS 2000 - Leadership for Sustainability


    (CU-CEL, CU-SBY)     
    Fall, spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    K. Anderson, S. Brylinsky, K. Hilversum, M. Hoffman, A. Kohut, J. Mt. Pleasant.

    This course is for students who are interested in becoming leaders for sustainability while on campus and throughout their lives. It is open to all levels. Students will focus primarily on sustainability issues in residence halls but opportunities to address similar issues across campus and/or in the community are also available. In the fall semester the focus is on reducing waste. During the spring semester emphasis is on reducing energy use and the risks associated with a changing climate. Students will increase their leadership and communication skills and better understand how to motivate themselves and others to change behaviors that will improve our stewardship of the world around us.

    Outcome 1: Demonstrate knowledge of climate change and the ways in which we can reduce our carbon footprint, especially through reduction in energy use (spring semester). Demonstrate knowledge of waste on campus and its environmental consequences (fall semester).

    Outcome 2: Identify and evaluate behaviors and practices that reduce waste and/or energy use.

    Outcome 3: Identify specific practices that can be used to motivate themselves and others to develop new behaviors and practices around waste reduction and energy use.

    Outcome 4: Identify critical elements of leadership; identify their individual leadership strengths and weaknesses; practice new leadership skills.

    Outcome 5: Demonstrate knowledge of Community-Based Social Marketing and use it change their own and others’ behaviors to increase campus sustainability.

    Outcome 6: Describe how social-economic class, ethnicity, gender, and race affect perspectives toward sustainability.

    Outcome 7: Identify and use skills to work effectively in teams.

    Outcome 8: Find credible information on issues related to waste reduction, energy use, and climate change, and the connection to sustainability.

    Outcome 9: Demonstrate project management, peer-education, and assessment skills by implementing projects.

    Outcome 10: Demonstrate improved communication skills about controversial sustainability issues.

  
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    ALS 2100 - Teams and Leaders in Action


    (KCM-AG, SBA-AG)      
    Winter, summer. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    M. W. Deets.

    What do effective leaders do? How do they think? How do they overcome challenges? How does your personality affect your ability to lead, and how can you use aspects of your personality to help others and yourself? This course examines the habits of thought and practice of exceptional leaders, past and present, to equip the student to lead in an increasingly complex, connected, and diverse world. The course consists of nearly equal parts theory, philosophy, practice, and historical case study. Lessons learned from historical case studies are matched with contemporary leadership theory and practice from the business world, the military, athletics, journalism, and space exploration. The primary course objective is to produce future leaders prepared to influence their communities in positive ways, regardless of profession.

    Outcome 1: By the end of the course, students should be able to: Formulate and execute plans to reach team goals.

    Outcome 2: Match their values, strengths, and personalities to specific purposes.

    Outcome 3: Listen more effectively.

    Outcome 4: Communicate more effectively.

    Outcome 5: Deal with conflict and tension in a team.

    Outcome 6: Interpret lessons learned from case studies on the history of exploration.

    Outcome 7: Build team diversity and unity.

  
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    ALS 2200 - Make Your Mark: Essential Professional Skills to Launch Your Career


         
    Spring. 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    J. DeRosa, L. Gillespie, D. Viands.

    Course will provide opportunities for students to identify and develop the professional skills employers and graduate and professional schools seek in college graduates. Students will engage in self-assessment to determine their current level of competency in key professional skills such as self-awareness/personal impact, critical thinking, teamwork, information management, and relationship building. Through interactive activities, assignments, and a group project students will hone some of the professional skills during the course and learn how to create a strategy for continued growth opportunities and personal development.

    Outcome 1: Students will be able to identify and describe the key professional skills employers and graduate schools look for in college graduates.

    Outcome 2: Use StrengthsQuest to recognize and develop natural strengths while at Cornell and in future career.

    Outcome 3: Students will discover their current level of competency around 8 professional skill clusters through the administration of the CALS Professional Skills Self-Assessment.

    Outcome 4: Student awareness of the resources available to enable self-direct efforts in professional skill development while at Cornell.

    Outcome 5: Students will create a personal learning plan to facilitate on-going personal development.

    Outcome 6: Students will be able to define emotional intelligence and recognize the role it plays in one’s career.

    Outcome 7: Student will learn about, engage in discussion, and demonstrate the professional skills needed by employers and graduate schools through assignments, case studies, and lectures.

    Outcome 8: Students will ascertain the benefit of reflection to promote continuous learning through the use of regular journaling assignments throughout the course.

  
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    ALS 2300 - CALS Global Fellows International Internship Preparation Workshop


         
    Spring (weeks 8-14). 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    Permission of instructor required. Enrollment limited to: students accepted into the CALS Global Fellows Program.

    J. Franke, C. Tarter, D. Viands.

    This course is designed to equip CALS Global Fellows with the tools and knowledge to be prepared, effective, and cross-culturally competent during their summer internship placement abroad (and beyond). The course will encourage students to critically reflect on the objectives of an international experience and how it can influence academic and personal development. We will explore the invisible boundaries of working in global business settings and examine cultural intelligence and cross-cultural dynamics, encouraging students to develop as future leaders in a variety of environments.

    Outcome 1: By the end of the course, students will be able to:
    • Define and analyze cultural intelligence and identify which factors they may face while abroad and how they may address them
    • Using cross-cultural frameworks, compare and contrast their host country culture with their own culture
    • Explain their host organization and internship position as well as their personal, professional, and academic goals of their
    internship
    • Assess and critically evaluate key aspects of the internship abroad including health, safety, and geographic location
    • Articulate professional and personal knowledge, skills and competencies and articulate an individual profile
    • Articulate strategies of coping with a variety of challenges of working in an independent setting abroad

  
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    ALS 2910 - Seminar on Analytical Methods and Critical Thinking


         
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    Offered in Auburn, Moravia, Romulus. This course is part of the CPEP program.

    T. Owens, R. Scott, J. Zeserson.

    This course focuses on methods for gathering research information (library, laboratory, field), approaches to the analysis of this information, and integration of this analysis into a final paper that demonstrates the student’s critical thinking on the topic. This course is intended as a capstone course for CPEP’s state-approved Certificate in the Liberal Arts. Students will be introduced to the breadth of research and analytical approaches. Students will compile a research bibliography from which they will write a final paper.

    Outcome 1: Articulate the range of approaches to gathering research information used by academics and evaluate their applicability to their own research topic.

    Outcome 2: Evaluate various approaches to the analysis of research data, in particular with respect to their own research topic.

    Outcome 3: Demonstrate their ability to incorporate critical thinking into their research analysis

    Outcome 4: Incorporate their understanding of the goals and format of academic writing into their final paper

    Outcome 5: Use feedback effectively to revise drafts of their final paper

    Outcome 6: Communicate, effectively and with clarity, their conclusions in the context of the research information available to them for this project.

  
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    ALS 3100 - Foundations in Leadership: Skills for Professional Success and Life


    (KCM-AG, SBA-AG)      
    Fall. 3 credits. S/U grades only.

    M. Hoffman, C. Sidle, D. R. Viands.

    This course frames leadership as a particular way of approaching life, one that is essential to career success as well as fulfillment in life itself. The course begins with the inner work of a leader’s personal development, and then turns to the outer work of a leader’s working through others.

    Outcome 1: Developed a critical understanding of contemporary leadership theories, styles, approaches and roles.

    Outcome 2: Examined and clarified personal inspirations, values, and purposes in careers and life.

    Outcome 3: Learned to align those inner motivations with personal actions, decisions, and communications in order to become more authentic, effective, and influential.

    Outcome 4: Built skills for communicating effectively especially in difficult conversations such as delivering feedback, resolving conflict, and negotiating agreements.

    Outcome 5: Practiced skills for building effective teams and leading group planning, decision making and problem solving processes.

    Outcome 6: Created a personal learning plan and leadership portfolio for supporting personal development.

    Outcome 7: Established a habit of reflection to promote continuous learning and responsible leadership.

  
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    ALS 3200 - [Leadership and Global Service Learning - Pre Fieldwork Course]

    (crosslisted) ILRIC 3200  
         
    Spring. 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: students must undertake study abroad, fieldwork, research, internship or community engaged service-learning (in the US or in another country) by the end of the calendar year or have permission of instructor.

    R. Kiely.

    This pre-fieldwork course examines leadership and global service-learning (GSL) themes and provides students a forum for critical reflection on community-driven service, intercultural learning, power and privilege, global citizenship, and each of the listed components’ relationships to one another. The pre-fieldwork seminar draws on best practices in community-engaged learning and research to develop the personal, professional and academic skill necessary for effective intercultural immersion while in a host community. Themes covered are personal values and ethics, professional etiquette working with diverse communities and organizations, project planning, critical reflection and community engagement in a cross-cultural context. Preparation includes the development of skills in critical reflection in order to document, communicate and apply what has been learned from the field experience. The course is intended for any student undertaking study abroad, fieldwork, and community engagement in the near future. ALS 3200 is one credit course and students are required to attend all five sessions. Students have an option of taking ALS 3210, Leadership and Global Service Learning – Post Fieldwork Course for 1 credit in the fall as an opportunity to reflect on their fieldwork experience and further apply their learning upon return.

    Outcome 1: Intercultural Learning: Students engage in active, meaningful participation in the life of the host community. Learning Outcomes:
    • Contrast home and host culture dominant norms, behaviors, and assumptions.
    • Employ enhanced knowledge of home and host culture to behave appropriately in host community and develop connections with community members.
    • Identify and describe home cultural assumptions that are enabling and limiting.
    • Demonstrate understanding of self as a cultural being.

    Outcome 2: Critical Reflection: Students develop critical thinking skills by examining diverse perspectives on course topics and comparing these perspectives across cultures and through the lens of the host community. Learning Outcomes:
    • Assess the relevance of course content to host community perspectives and experiences.
    • Communicate the relevance of disciplinary content, intercultural learning, and global civic engagement strategies for host and home communities.
    • Identify sources of learning during the course experience; assess the strengths and weaknesses of those sources.

  
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    ALS 3210 - [Leadership and Global Service Learning - Post Fieldwork Course]

    (crosslisted) ILRIC 3210  
         
    Fall (seven-week session). 1 credit. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: Student must have undertaken study abroad, fieldwork, research, internship or community engaged service-learning (in the US or in another country) or have been previously enrolled in ALS 3200  /ILRIC 3200 .

    R. Kiely.

    This post-field work course provides students who have participated in field study, service-learning, research or study abroad a forum for critical reflection on leadership, community-driven service, intercultural learning, power and privilege, and global citizenship. This course offers participants an opportunity to describe, analyze and communicate their learning through an examination of their field experience, selected readings and class discussions. Areas covered are personal values and ethics, professional norms and practices working with diverse communities and organizations, leadership, global citizenship and post-project research and writing activities aimed at continued learning and furthering social change. Post-field course activities include the development of skills in reflection and evaluation that communicate the value and learning that results from a cross-cultural and community-engaged learning experience. The course is intended for any student who has undertaken fieldwork (within the US or overseas) or study abroad. The course focuses on Critical Reflection, Intercultural Learning, Global Citizenship, Writing for Social Change, documentation and learning from experience in diverse contexts.

    Outcome 1: Intercultural Learning: Contrast home and host culture dominant norms, behaviors, and assumptions.
    • Identify and describe cultural assumptions that are enabling and limiting.
    • Demonstrate understanding of self as a cultural being.
    • Explore dimensions of community-building and development across difference.

    Outcome 2: Global Citizenship and Civic Engagement.
    • Examine the meaning of global citizenship.
    • Describe, explain and develop civic leadership skills in diverse community settings and
    contexts.

    Outcome 3: Critical Reflection: Students develop critical thinking skills by examining diverse perspectives on course topics and comparing these perspectives across cultures and through the lens of the host community.
    • Assess the relevance of course content to host community perspectives and experiences.
    • Communicate the relevance of disciplinary content, intercultural learning, and global civic
    engagement strategies for host and home communities.
    • Identify sources of learning during the course experience; assess the strengths and
    weaknesses of those sources.

    Outcome 4: Writing for individual learning and social change.
    • Students describe, explain and communicate the meaning of their service, global civic
    participation and/or fieldwork and examine diverse activities and media for fostering social
    change.

  
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    ALS 3600 - Community Engagement and Climate Change in the Mekong Delta: Insights into Vietnam

    (crosslisted) ASIAN 3360  
    (CU-CEL, CU-ITL, CU-SBY)     
    Spring (weeks 1-7). 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Permission of instructor required. This course includes a January in-country two-week service-learning experience.

    T. Tranviet.

    The combination of seminar and international service-learning course provides a unique opportunity to connect classroom instruction with experiential learning while gaining a broad understanding of the impacts resulting from climate change. In addition, the course includes background on Vietnamese history and culture. A two-week field trip in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam offers students opportunity to experience firsthand the dire situation in the region and gain a deeper and more personalized understanding of these pressing issues due to a rapidly changing climate.

    Outcome 1: Respect and appreciate the culture, history and resilience of Vietnam and its people.

    Outcome 2: Comprehend what climate change means to an agrarian country like Vietnam and implications for the global food system.

    Outcome 3: Formulate solutions to the challenges posed by climate change to the Mekong Delta of Vietnam and beyond.

    Outcome 4: Assess what was gained from the course and integrate this into their personal and professional life-path.

    Outcome 5: Realize the importance of sharing the climate change story with others.

    Outcome 6: Gain practical and meaningful international experience and leadership skills.

    Outcome 7: Enhance the sense of worldview and civic engagement and social responsibility.

  
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    ALS 3920 - New York State Government Affairs

    (crosslisted) HE 3920  
         
    Spring. 12 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: minimum GPA of 2.3. Enrollment limited to: sophomore, junior or senior standing.

    Staff.

    For description, see HE 3920 .

  
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    ALS 4940 - Special Topics in Agriculture and Life Sciences


         
    Fall, spring. 1-4 credits, variable. Student option grading.

    Staff.

    The college teaches “trial” or temporary courses under this number. Offerings vary by semester and are advertised by the college before the beginning of the semester. The same course is not offered more than twice under this number.

  
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    ALS 4960 - Internship in Agriculture and Life Sciences


         
    Fall, spring, summer. 1-3 credits, variable (may be repeated up to 6 credits). S/U grades only.

    Permission of advisor required. Students must register using CALS Special Studies form available online.

    Staff.

    All 4960 internship courses must adhere to the CALS guidelines at cals.cornell.edu/academics/student-research/internship. Students planning internships related to the discipline of a department are encouraged to enroll in the departmental internship course.

  
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    ALS 4970 - Independent Study in Agriculture and Life Sciences


         
    Fall, spring. 1-6 credits, variable. Student option grading.

    Permission of instructor required. Students must register using CALS Special Studies form available online.

    Staff.

    Independent study for undergraduate students.

  
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    ALS 4980 - Undergraduate Teaching Assistant


         
    Fall, spring. 1-4 credits, variable. Student option grading.

    Permission of instructor required. Students must register using CALS Special Studies form available online.

    Staff.

    Students learn and experience assisting in a course under the direction of a course instructor.

  
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    ALS 4990 - Undergraduate Research in Agriculture and Life Sciences


    (CU-UGR)     
    Fall, spring. 1-6 credits, variable. Student option grading.

    Permission of instructor required. Students must register using CALS Special Studies form available online.

    Staff.

    Independent research for undergraduate students.

  
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    ALS 4998 - Politics and Policy: Theory, Research, and Practice

    (crosslisted) AMST 4998 , CAPS 4998 , GOVT 4998 , PAM 4060  
         
    Fall, spring. 8 credits. Letter grades only.

    Offered in Washington, D.C. Students in CALS must register for ALS 4998.

    D. Silbey.

    For description, see GOVT 4998 .

  
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    ALS 5780 - International Teaching Assistant Development Program Course 1


         
    Fall, spring. 2 credits. S/U grades only.

    Prerequisite: ITA Language Assessment or permission of ITAP. Priority given based on immediacy of TA assignment.

    K. Kenyon.

    Designed for international teaching assistants. This course focuses on oral communication, cross-cultural classroom dynamics, and teaching techniques. Through small group seminars, conferences with instructors, audio journals, and a teaching practicum, students work to expand their communication and pedagogical skills.

    Outcome 1: Define components of Advanced Level Speech communication.

    Outcome 2: Identify and practice word, phrasal and sentence stress, intonation and comprehensible pronunciation.

    Outcome 3: Apply knowledge of Advanced Level Speech components to monitor speech during communication.

    Outcome 4: Organize knowledge as a TA using Advanced Level Speech components such as comparison, narration, description and explanation.

    Outcome 5: Evaluate and prioritize areas of communication to improve through reflection.

    Outcome 6: Examine the concept of culture and its influence on teaching and communication.

  
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    ALS 5790 - International Teaching Assistant Development Program Course 2


         
    Fall, spring. 2 credits. S/U grades only.

    Prerequisite: ITA Language Assessment or permission of ITAP. Priority given based on immediacy of TA assignment.

    K. Kenyon.

    Designed as a follow-up to ALS 5780 . This course focuses on oral communication, cross-cultural classroom dynamics, and teaching techniques. Through small group seminars, conferences with instructors, audio journals, and teaching practice, international teaching assistants work to expand their communication and pedagogical skills.

    Outcome 1: Define components of Advanced Level Speech communication.

    Outcome 2: Identify and practice word, phrasal and sentence stress, intonation and comprehensible pronunciation.

    Outcome 3: Apply knowledge of Advanced Level Speech components to monitor speech during communication.

    Outcome 4: Organize knowledge as a TA using Advanced Level Speech components such as comparison, narration, description and explanation.

    Outcome 5: Evaluate and prioritize areas of communication to improve through reflection.

    Outcome 6: Examine the concept of culture and its influence on teaching and communication.

  
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    ALS 6014 - Theater Techniques for Enhancing Teaching and Public Speaking


         
    Fall, spring (weeks 1-7). 1 credit. S/U grades only (no audit).

    Permission of instructor required.

    A. Beukema, C. McLinn, M. Ouellett.

    This seven-week course uses theater techniques to help graduate students enhance their classroom teaching and public speaking in both formal and informal environments. Using the storytelling and character-development techniques of theatrical improvisation, participants will build decision-making skills and their ability to think creatively under pressure through engaging exercises. The goals for this course are to enhance teaching presence in the classroom, form a learning community, and build the confidence necessary to connect with a variety of audiences in a range of educational settings. Participants will design and present a short lesson or talk. Due to the active and sequential nature of the class, please defer taking the course if you know in advance that your schedule will require you to miss two or more sessions.

    Outcome 1: Identify theater strategies for enhancing classroom teaching and public speaking in formal and informal settings.

    Outcome 2: Utilize and practice improvisational techniques to think creatively under pressure and to project confidence and respect for diverse perspectives.

    Outcome 3: Apply storytelling techniques to communicate discipline-specific content more effectively, and in a more engaging manner.

    Outcome 4: Integrate story arcs into presentations and lesson planning.

    Outcome 5: Describe research on the use of theater techniques for enhancing teaching including how using theater techniques works to build more inclusive classes.

    Outcome 6: Design and present a short lesson or talk that includes: a rationale for how the lesson or talk was constructed around learning outcomes, the theater or public speaking principles applied, and methods for assessing student/audience engagement and learning.

    Outcome 7: Demonstrate evidence of reflective practice and learning through a web-based portfolio.

  
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    ALS 6015 - The Practice of Teaching in Higher Education


         
    Fall, spring. 2-3 credits, variable. Letter grades only.

    M. Ouellett, P.T. Prusko, K. Williams.

    The course will assist graduate students prepare for a faculty position in higher education. Course assignments and activities cover effective teaching and professional development. Students will complete an electronic portfolio in preparation for employment. The course covers faculty roles and responsibilities, educational philosophies, learning theories, instructional methods, course design, assessment among others.

    Outcome 1: Distinguish between the purpose, context and culture of different higher education institutions.

    Outcome 2: Articulate an academic professional identity through a CV, vision statement, and research statement.

    Outcome 3: Construct and articulate a statement of teaching philosophy as a future faculty member in higher education.

    Outcome 4: Analyze and explain theories of learning and instructional design that enhance teaching and student learning in higher education settings.

    Outcome 5: Design a course syllabus and communicate a rationale for the selection of materials, sequencing of course content, design of activities and methods of assessment.

    Outcome 6: Describe and explain how to incorporate technologies into a specific course design to enhance teaching and learning in higher education.

    Outcome 7: Demonstrate an understanding of criteria for assessing the quality of learning and teaching in higher education by creating a rubric.

    Outcome 8: Communicate concepts and ideas related to excellence in teaching and learning in higher education through discussion (online/F2F), peer feedback and other presentation formats.

    Outcome 9: Demonstrate evidence of reflective practice and learning through peer feedback, F2F-Online communication and the development of a web-based portfolio.

  
  •  

    ALS 6016 - Teaching as Research in Higher Education


         
    Fall, spring. 2 credits. S/U grades only.

    Prerequisite: ALS 6015 . This course is open to all graduate teaching assistants and graduate students interested in using research to inform and improve their teaching. Students participating in CTE collaborative programming (i.e., CIRTL, Teagle, CTE’s Graduate Research in Teaching Fellowship Program, and future faculty programs in City and Regional Planning and Biological and Biomedical Sciences) may be required to enroll in this course in order to complete their program requirements.

    M. Ouellett,T. Pettit, K. Williams.

    Course will expose students to the literature on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL). Within this academic conversation about the scholarship of teaching and learning and teaching as research, students will design and complete their own original research project to inform teaching in their discipline. This course culminates in the creation of a teaching as research project to include: a literature review incorporating SOTL resources from one’s discipline; a methodology designed to address a particular need in one’s teaching and/or within teaching in one’s discipline; a critical analysis of the results and conclusions in a formal research report. Throughout the process students will give and receive critical feedback during key developmental stages and will have opportunities to present their reports in multiple venues.

    Outcome 1: Evaluate the scholarship of teaching and teaching as research literature within their disciplines in a literature review.

    Outcome 2: Evaluate various research methodologies used in the research on teaching (e.g., qualitative, quantitative, mixed-methods, teacher-action research methods) to select the most appropriate methodology for their project.

    Outcome 3: Describe all the ethical implications of their study as evidenced within the “risks” portion of their IRB applications.

    Outcome 4: Write all parts of a research on teaching report (i.e., abstract, introduction, literature review, methods, results, conclusions, discussion, references, appendix) to include all critical elements defined in the final project rubric.

    Outcome 5: Present their research findings using presentation strategies discussed in class (i.e., poster, discussion, lecture, etc.) to meet the criteria stated in the presentation rubric.

    Outcome 6: Identify ways to continue their own teaching as research projects to inform their teaching.


AMST—American Studies

  
  •  

    AMST 1101 - Introduction to American Studies


    (HB) (CA-AS)      
    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    M. P. Brady

    This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary considerations of American culture. Specific topics may change from year to year and may include questions of national consensus versus native, immigrant and racial subcultures and countercultures; industrialization and the struggles over labor; the rise of leisure; the transformation of (the frequently gendered) public and private spheres; the relationship between politics and culture; the development and distinctions among consumer culture, mass culture and popular culture. These themes will be examined through a variety of media, such as literature, historical writing, music, art, film, architecture, etc. The course will also give attention to the many methods through which scholars have, over time, developed the discipline of American Studies.

  
  •  

    AMST 1104 - Race and Ethnicity in the United States: Social Constructs, Real World Consequences

    (crosslisted) LSP 1105 , SOC 1104  
    (SBA-AS) (CU-SBY)     
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    S. Alvarado.

    For description, see SOC 1104  

  
  •  

    AMST 1115 - Introduction to American Government and Politics

    (crosslisted) GOVT 1111  
    (SBA-AS)      
    Fall, summer. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    S. Mettler.

    For description, see GOVT 1111 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1144 - FWS: American Cities in the Global Economy: Market, People, Place


         
    Fall. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    P. Wissoker.

    Why do some regions thrive during a recession? What role can local governments play in an economic system that seems to exacerbate the divide between rich and poor?  Using cities as a lens, we’ll examine the global economy and how it helps shape the way we live. Drawing on readings from both the popular press and the academy, we will investigate a range of places and industries: from international manufacturers and regional home builders to chain stores and investment banks; from small, single-industry towns to large, urban regions. In class and through written assignments, you will learn to analyze, explain, and debate the economic geography of U.S. cities, all the while learning the writing skills you’ll need at Cornell and in the wider world.

  
  •  

    AMST 1147 - FWS: The Legal Life of American Racism


         
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    First-Year Writing Seminar.

    J. Goldberg.

    We know that racism isn’t just about feelings, but rather it is institutional. What about the legal life of racism? That is, what if racism wasn’t just a result of how the legal system (courts, police, prisons, etc.) applies laws, but what if racism had a life within U.S. law itself? In this course we will explore the ways in which American law worked in concert with custom to attempt to encode definitions of race into U.S. society. Topics will include slavery, Jim Crow, immigration (both contemporary and historical), Japanese internment, and Indian Law, among others. Students will practice writing skills while exploring the possibilities practicing a radical form of revision to intervene in the legal life of racism.

  
  •  

    AMST 1160 - Learning Where You Live: Americans Encountering Race, Culture, and Community through Food


    (CU-CEL)     
    Spring. 2 credits. S/U grades only.

    S. Samuels.

    This course explores both the joyful and the dark sides of eating and traces how “taste” informs the various ways in which we ingest the world, specifically “racial and cultural otherness.” We will explore the various connections, both abstractly and materially, between food, race, culture and politics. We will consider how the meeting of food, word, and image (in novels, poems, and television) inform large social categories. This course approaches food through a comparative racial-ethnic framework, including works from Asian American, African American, and Latino cultural producers. Students will engage in group discussions, considering food and putting it in conversation with literature, art, current events, imperialism, and history. Students will also have the opportunity to engage in tastings, hands-on food preparation, and community dinner.

  
  •  

    AMST 1290 - American Society through Film

    (crosslisted) SOC 1290  
    (SBA-AS) (CU-SBY)     
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    D. Strang.

    For description, see SOC 1290 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1312 - [History of Rock Music]

    (crosslisted) MUSIC 1312  
    (LA-AS)      
    Spring. Next offered 2018-2019. 3 credits. Student option grading.

    No previous training in music required.

    J. Peraino.

    For description, see MUSIC 1312 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1313 - A Survey of Jazz

    (crosslisted) MUSIC 1313  
    (LA-AS)      
    Spring. 3 credits. Student option grading.

    No previous training in music required.

    S. Pond.

    For description, see MUSIC 1313 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1321 - [Music of Mexico and the Mexican Diaspora]

    (crosslisted) LATA 1321 , LSP 1321 MUSIC 1321 , SPAN 1321  
    (CA-AS)      
    Spring. Next offered 2018-2019. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    A. Madrid.

    For description, see MUSIC 1321 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1500 - Introduction to Africana Studies

    (crosslisted) ASRC 1500 , GOVT 1503  
    (GB) (CA-AS)      
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    O. Taiwo.

    For description, see ASRC 1500 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1540 - American Capitalism

    (crosslisted) HIST 1540 ILRLR 1845  
    (HA-AS)      
    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    N. Maggor.

    For description, see HIST 1540 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1572 - America’s Wars from Alexander Hamilton to Barack Obama and Beyond, 1776-future

    (crosslisted) HIST 1572  
         
    Summer. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Offered in Washington, D.C. Also offered as a distance learning course.

    D. Silbey.

    For description, see HIST 1572 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1581 - [America at War to 1898]

    (crosslisted) HIST 1581  
    (HB) (HA-AS)      
    Fall. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    J. Parmenter.

    For description, see HIST 1581 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1585 - Sports and Politics in American History

    (crosslisted) HIST 1585  
    (HA-AS)      
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    L. Glickman.

    For description, see HIST 1585 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1595 - [African American History From 1865]

    (crosslisted) ASRC 1595 , HIST 1595  
    (HA-AS)      
    Fall. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    R. Rickford.

    For description, see HIST 1595 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1600 - Indigenous North America

    (crosslisted) AIIS 1100 , ANTHR 1700  
    (GHB) (HA-AS)      
    Fall. 3 credits. Student option grading.

    P. Nadasdy.

    For description, see AIIS 1100 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1601 - Indigenous Issues in Global Perspectives

    (crosslisted) AIIS 1110  
    (CA-AS)      
    Spring. 3 credits. Student option grading.

    T. Richardson.

    For description, see AIIS 1110 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1640 - [U.S. History since the Great Depression]

    (crosslisted) HIST 1640  
    (HA-AS)      
    Fall. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    J. Kohler-Hausmann.

    For description, see HIST 1640 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1800 - [Immigration in U.S. History]

    (crosslisted) HIST 1800 , LSP 1800  
    (HA-AS)      
    Spring. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    M. C. Garcia.

    For description, see HIST 1800 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1802 - [Introduction to Latinos in U.S. History]

    (crosslisted) HIST 1802 , LATA 1802 , LSP 1802  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    M. Garcia.

    For description, see HIST 1802 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1885 - Consumer Culture

    (crosslisted) HIST 1885  
    (HA-AS)      
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    A. Johnson.

    For description, see HIST 1885 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1886 - [Introduction to Food Studies: History and Culture]

    (crosslisted) HIST 1886  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    A. Johnson.

    For description, see HIST 1886 .

  
  •  

    AMST 1951 - Foreign Policy as Subversion

    (crosslisted) HIST 1951 , LATA 1951  
    (GB) (HA-AS)      
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    R. Craib, T. Loos.

    For description, see HIST 1951 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2000 - Introduction to Visual Studies

    (crosslisted) ARTH 2000 , COML 2000 , VISST 2000  
    (LA-AS)      
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Requirement for Visual Studies minor.

    A. Moisey.

    For description, see VISST 2000 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2001 - [The First American University]

    (crosslisted) ENGL 2999 , HIST 2005  
         
    Not offered 2017-2018. 1 credit. Student option grading.

    E. Baptist, C. Earle.

    Educational historian Frederick Rudolph called Cornell University “the first American university,” referring to its unique role as a coeducational, nonsectarian, land-grant institution with a broad curriculum and diverse student body. In this course, we will explore the history of Cornell, taking as our focus the pledge of Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White to found a university where “any person can find instruction in any study.” The course will cover a wide range of topics and perspectives relating to the faculty, student body, evolution of campus, and important events and eras in Cornell history. Stories and vignettes will provide background on the current university and its administrative structure, campus traditions, and the names that adorn buildings and memorials throughout campus. Finally, the course will offer a forum for students to address questions on present-day aspects of the university.

  
  •  

    AMST 2010 - [Popular Culture in the United States, 1900 to 1945]


    (HA-AS)      
    Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    G. Altschuler.

    This course deals with American popular culture in the period between 1900 and the end of World War II. As we examine best-sellers, films, sports and television, radio, ads, newspapers, magazines, and music, the goal is to better understand popular culture as “contested terrain,” the place where social classes, racial and ethnic groups, women and men, the powerful and the less powerful, seek to “control” images and themes. Topics include the Western; Cultural Heroes and the Cult of Individualism in the 1920s; The Hays Code and the Black Sox scandal; Mae West and the “New Women”; Advertising in an Age of Consumption; Gangsters and G-Men; and Jackie Robinson and the American Dilemma.

  
  •  

    AMST 2016 - [Understanding Global Capitalism Through Service Learning]

    (crosslisted) ASRC 2006 , HIST 2006  
    (GB) (HA-AS) (CU-CEL, CU-ITL)     
    Spring. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    E. Baptist.

    For description, see HIST 2006 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2017 - [Global Capitalism in One Community]

    (crosslisted) ASRC 2007 , HIST 2007  
    (GB) (HA-AS) (CU-CEL)     
    Winter. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Offered in Jamaica.

    E. Baptist.

    For description, see HIST 2007 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2020 - Popular Culture in the United States, 1950 to 2000


    (HA-AS)      
    Winter. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    G. Altschuler.

    This course treats the period from 1950 to 2000 as we examine best-sellers, films, sports and television, radio, ads, newspapers, magazines, and music. We try to better understand the ways in which popular culture shapes and/or reflects American values. The course also depicts popular culture as “contested terrain,” the place where social classes, racial and ethnic groups, women and men, the powerful and less powerful seek to “control” images and themes. Topics include The Honeymooners and 1950s television; soap operas; “gross-out” movies; Elvis; the Beatles, and Guns ‘n Roses; gothic romances; and People Magazine and USA Today.

  
  •  

    AMST 2030 - [Introduction to American Literatures: Beginnings to the Civil War]

    (crosslisted) ENGL 2030  
    (HB) (LA-AS)      
    Fall. Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    S. Samuels.

    For description, see ENGL 2030 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2040 - [Introduction to American Literature: Civil War to the Present]

    (crosslisted) ENGL 2040  
    (LA-AS)      
    Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    M. P. Brady.

    For description, see ENGL 2040 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2060 - The Great American Cornell Novel

    (crosslisted) ENGL 2060  
    (LA-AS)      
    4 credits. Student option grading.

    K. Attell.

    For description, see ENGL 2060 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2090 - The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692

    (crosslisted) FGSS 2090 , HIST 2090  
    (HB) (HA-AS)      
    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    M. B. Norton.

    For description, see HIST 2090 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2105 - [The American Musical]

    (crosslisted) ENGL 2150 , MUSIC 2250 , PMA 2650  
    (LA-AS)      
    Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    N. Salvato.

    For description, see PMA 2650 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2106 - Introduction to Latina/o Studies

    (crosslisted) LSP 2100  
    (CA-AS)      
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    K. Jaime.

    For description, see LSP 2100 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2108 - [Indigenous Ingenuities as Living Networks]

    (crosslisted) AIIS 2100 , ARTH 2101  
    (HB) (CA-AS) (CU-UGR)     
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    J. Rickard.

    For description and learning outcomes, see AIIS 2100 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2111 - [Black History Topics Through Film]

    (crosslisted) ASRC 2211 , HIST 2111  
    (HA-AS)      
    Spring. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    M. Washington.

    For description, see HIST 2111 

  
  •  

    AMST 2112 - Black Spirituality, Religion & Protest

    (crosslisted) ASRC 2112 , HIST 2112 , RELST 2112  
    (HA-AS)      
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    M. Washington.

    For description, see HIST 2112 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2145 - Food in America

    (crosslisted) HIST 2145  
    (HA-AS)      
    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    A. Johnson.

    For description, see HIST 2145 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2152 - (Im)migration and (Im)migrants: Then and Now

    (crosslisted) GOVT 2152 , LSP 2152  
    (SBA-AS)      
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    S. Garcia-Rios.

    For description, see GOVT 2152 .

  
  
  •  

    AMST 2220 - From the New Deal to the Age of Reagan

    (crosslisted) HIST 2220  
    (HA-AS)      
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    L. Glickman.

    For description, see HIST 2220 .

  
  
  •  

    AMST 2251 - [U.S. Immigration Narratives]

    (crosslisted) HIST 2251 , LSP 2251  
    (HB) (HA-AS)      
    Spring. Next Offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    M. C. Garcia.

    For description, see HIST 2251 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2252 - Immigrant Ithaca

    (crosslisted) HIST 2252 , LSP 2252  
    (HA-AS) (CU-CEL)     
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Permission of instructor required. Enrollment limited to: 15 undergraduates.

    M. C. Garcia.

    For description, see LSP 2252 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2260 - [Music of the 1960s]

    (crosslisted) MUSIC 2260  
    (CA-AS)      
    Spring. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    B. Piekut.

    For description, see MUSIC 2260 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2293 - [Digital History]

    (crosslisted) HIST 2293  
    (HA-AS)      
    Fall. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    E. Baptist.

    For description, see HIST 2293 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2320 - Latino Music in the US

    (crosslisted) LSP 2320 , MUSIC 2320 , SPAN 2330  
    (CA-AS)      
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    A. Madrid.

    For description, see MUSIC 2320 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2331 - [Agriculture, History, and Society: From Squanto to Biotechnology]

    (crosslisted) STS 2331  
    (HA-AS) (CU-SBY)     
    Fall. Not offered 2017-2018. 3 credits. Student option grading.

    Staff.

    For description, see STS 2331 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2340 - The Beatles

    (crosslisted) MUSIC 2340 
    (CA-AS)      
    Fall. 3 credits. Student option grading.

    J. Peraino.

    For description, see MUSIC 2340 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2350 - Archaeology of North American Indians

    (crosslisted) AIIS 2350 , ANTHR 2235 , ARKEO 2235  
    (GHB) (HA-AS)      
    Fall. 3 credits. Student option grading.

    K. Jordan.

    For description, see ANTHR 2235 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2352 - [Paul Robeson and the Revolutionary Imagination]

    (crosslisted) ASRC 2352 , HIST 2352  
    (HA-AS)      
    Spring. Next Offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    R. Rickford.

    For description, see HIST 2352 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2353 - [Civil Rights vs. Human Rights in the Black Freedom Struggle]

    (crosslisted) ASRC 2353 , HIST 2353  
    (HA-AS)      
    Spring. Next offered 2019-2020. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    R. Rickford.

    For description see HIST 2353 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2390 - [Seminar in Iroquois History]

    (crosslisted) AIIS 2390 , HIST 2390  
    (HB) (HA-AS)      
    Fall. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    J. Parmenter.

    For description, see HIST 2390 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2401 - [Introduction to Latino/a Literature]

    (crosslisted) ENGL 2400 , LSP 2400  
    (LA-AS)      
    Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    E. Diaz.

    For description, see ENGL 2400 . (LT)

  
  •  

    AMST 2405 - The Italian-American Experience

    (crosslisted) ITAL 2400  
    (LA-AS)      
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Conducted in English.

    V. Fulginiti.

    For description, see ITAL 2400 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2411 - [Enslaved! Then and Now]

    (Crosslisted) ASRC 2411 , HIST 2411  
    (HB) (HA-AS)      
    Spring. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    S. Greene.

    For description, see HIST 2411 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2422 - The History of the U.S. Prison

    (crosslisted) HIST 2422  
    (HA-AS)      
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    J. Kohler-Hausmann.

    For description, see HIST 2422 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2423 - [Dazed and Confused: The Politics of Drug and Alcohol in US History]

    (crosslisted) HIST 2423  
    (HA-AS)      
    Spring. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    J. Kohler-Hausmann.

    For description, see HIST 2423 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2504 - Obama and the Meaning of Race

    (crosslisted) ASRC 2504 , GOVT 2604 , SOC 2520  
    (SBA-AS)      
    Spring. 3 credits. Student option grading.

    T. Gosa.

    For description, see ASRC 2504 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2511 - [Black Women to 1900]

    (crosslisted) ASRC 2511 , FGSS 2511 , HIST 2511  
    (HB) (HA-AS)      
    Fall. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    M. Washington.

    For description, see HIST 2511 . (HI)

  
  •  

    AMST 2512 - Black Women in the 20th Century

    (crosslisted) ASRC 2512 , FGSS 2512 , HIST 2512  
    (HA-AS)      
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    M. Washington.

    For description, see HIST 2512 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2560 - Waiting for Superman: Perspectives on the Crisis in American Education

    (crosslisted) PAM 2550  
    (SBA-AS)      
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    M. Fitzpatrick.

    For description, see PAM 2550  

  
  
  •  

    AMST 2581 - Environmental History

    (crosslisted) BSOC 2581 , HIST 2581  
    (HB) (HA-AS)      
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    A. Sachs.

    For description, see HIST 2581 .

  
  •  

    AMST 2600 - Introduction to Native American Literature

    (crosslisted) AIIS 2600 , ENGL 2600  
    (LA-AS)      
    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    C. Warrior.

    For description, see ENGL 2600 .

 

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