Courses of Study 2017-2018 
    
    May 27, 2020  
Courses of Study 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

ANTHR—Anthropology

  
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    ANTHR 6230 - Humans and Animals

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 6230  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 3230 /ARKEO 3230 .

    N. Russell.

    Human-animal relationships are often seen in utilitarian, nutritional terms, particularly in archaeology. But animals and meat have significance far beyond their economic value. This course focuses on a broad range of these non-dietary roles of animals in human societies, past and present. This includes the fundamental shift in human-animal relations associated with domestication; the varied meanings of wild and domestic animals; as well as the importance of animals as wealth, as objects of sacrifice, as totems (metaphors for humans), and as symbols in art. Meat can be used in feasting and meat sharing to create, cement, and manipulate social relationships. This course is open to students of archaeology, cultural anthropology, and other disciplines with an interest in human-animal relations.

  
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    ANTHR 6232 - Politics of the Past

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 6232  
         
    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 3232 /ARKEO 3232 .

    N. Russell.

    Archaeology has never operated in a vacuum. This course examines the political context of the study of the past, and the uses to which accounts of the past have been put in the present. Archaeology is often implicated in nationalist claims to territory, or claims of ethnic, racial, or religious superiority. Museum exhibits and other presentations to the public always have an agenda, consciously or otherwise. Archaeologists are increasingly required to interact with descendent communities, often in the context of postcolonial tensions. The antiquities trade and the protection of archaeological sites connects archaeologists to commercial and law enforcement sectors. We will also consider the internal politics of the practice of archaeology in various settings, including the implications of the funding sources that support archaeological work. This course is open to students of archaeology, socio-cultural anthropology, history, and other disciplines with an interest in the past.

  
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    ANTHR 6235 - Bioarchaeology

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 6235  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 3235 /ARKEO 3235 .

    M. Velasco.

    Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.

  
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    ANTHR 6245 - [Across the Seas: Contacts between the Americas and the Old World Before Columbus]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 6245  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2019-2020. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 3245 /ARKEO 3245 .

    J. Henderson.

    This course considers the possibility of connections between the America and the Old World before the Spanish “discovery” not only as an empirical question, but also as an intensely controversial issue that has tested the limits of the scholarly detachment that archaeologists imagine characterizes their perspectives. We will consider the evidence for several possible episodes of interaction as well as the broader issue of how long-distance interaction can be recognized in the archaeological record.  Transoceanic contact is a common element in popular visions of the American past, but most professional archaeologists have rejected the possibility with great vehemence.  The issue provides an interesting case study in the power of orthodoxy in archaeology.

  
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    ANTHR 6248 - Finger Lakes and Beyond: Archaeology of the Native Northeast

    (crosslisted) AIIS 6248 , AMST 6248 , ARKEO 6248  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with AIIS 3248 /AMST 3248 /ANTHR 3248 /ARKEO 3248 .

    K. Jordan.

    This course provides a long-term overview of the indigenous peoples of Cornell’s home region and their neighbors from an archaeological perspective.  Cornell students live and work in the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee, or Six Nations Iroquois, and this class will help residents to understand the deep history of this place. We will examine long-term changes in material culture, settlement, subsistence, and trade; the founding of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy; indigenous responses to European and American colonization; the practicalities of doing indigenous-site archaeology in New York State; and contemporary indigenous perspectives on archaeology. Visits to local archaeological sites and museum collections will supplement classroom instruction.

  
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    ANTHR 6255 - Ancient Mexico and Central America

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 6255 , LATA 6255  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 3255 /ARKEO 3255 /LATA 3550 .

    J. Henderson.

    An introduction to ancient Mesoamerica, focusing on the nature and development of societies that are arguably the most complex to develop anywhere in the precolumbian Americas.  The course provides a summary of the history of the region before the European invasion, but the emphasis is on the organization of Mesoamerican societies: the distinctive features of Mesoamerican cities, economies, political systems, religion.  We begin by considering Mesoamerican societies at the time of the Spanish invasion.  Our focus will be on descriptions of the Aztecs of Central Mexico by Europeans and indigenous survivors, in an attempt to extract from them a model of the fundamental organizational features of one Mesoamerican society, making allowances for what we can determine about the perspectives and biases of their authors.  We then review the precolumbian history of Mesoamerica looking for variations on these themes as well as indications of alternative forms of organization.  We will also look at such issues as the transition from mobile to sedentary lifeways, the processes involved in the domestication of plants and animals, the emergence of cities and states, and the use of invasion-period and ethnographic information to interpret precolumbian societies in comparative perspective.

  
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    ANTHR 6256 - [Maya History]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 6256 , LATA 6256  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4216 /ARKEO 4216 /LATA 4215 .

    J. Henderson.

    This course is an exploration of Maya understandings of their own history as it is reflected in ancient texts. We will begin by looking at episodes in Colonial and recent history to illustrate some of the ways Maya thinking about history may differ from more familiar genres. We will then review basic aspects of precolumbian Maya writing, but we will focus mainly on analyzing texts from one or more Classic period Maya cities.

  
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    ANTHR 6267 - Contemporary Archaeological Theory

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 6267  
         
    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    N. Russell.

    This course surveys recent developments and current debates in archaeological theory.  This includes the processual/postprocessual debate and contrasts between scientific and humanistic approaches more generally, as well as other approaches (Marxist, feminist, etc.)  We will examine epistemological issues (how do we know about the past?), and will explore how different theoretical approaches have shaped research on key archaeological topics.  We will also discuss ethical concerns and engagement with groups outside archaeology with interests in the past.

  
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    ANTHR 6269 - [Gender and Age in Archaeology]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 6269 , FGSS 6700  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2019-2020. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 3269 /ARKEO 3269 /FGSS 3700 .

    N. Russell.

    In recent years, feminist theory has begun to have an impact on archaeological thought. It is now recognized that gender is likely to have been a relevant dimension of social organization in past societies. Some archaeologists are also trying to take into account the differing interests and experiences of children, adults of reproductive age, and the elderly. This course will not be limited to any period or geographical area, but will range widely in examining how feminist theory has been applied to archaeological data and models. We will consider whether it is necessary to identify women and men, adults and children in the archaeological record in order to take gender and age into account. We will also examine the uses of archaeological data by contemporary feminists.

  
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    ANTHR 6401 - [Material Theory I: Landscape & Place]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 6401  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2020-2021. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: an introductory course in social thought.

    A. T. Smith.

    Over the last two decades, space has come to be seen as an active element in social, political, and cultural processes, shaping actions and constraining possibilities. As space has been transformed from a passive setting for action to a critical force in social process, landscape and place have emerged as unifying concepts for the interpretation of distinctly “social” spaces. This course will consider the primary contemporary approaches to landscape and place, considering theoretical writings and spatial case studies drawn from archaeology, ethnography, art history, architecture, and geography. We will also consider contemporary methods of spatial analysis, particularly GIS frameworks) and assess their impact on human communities. The goal of the course is to provide students with a strong foundation in current spatial theory, familiarize them with the tools of spatial decision-making that are reshaping the world, and help them to develop the analytical tools required for making sense of landscapes and places. As the first offering in a sequence focused on material theory, this course is part of a wider effort to train students to be astute analysts of the material world.

  
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    ANTHR 6402 - [Material Theory II: Assemblage & Object]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 6402  
         
    Spring. Next offered 2020-2021. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ANTHR 6401 /ARKEO 6401  or other course in social thought.

    A. T. Smith.

    This course explores recent efforts to theorize the materiality of human social, political, and cultural life. We will draw broadly from contemporary works in archaeology, socio-cultural anthropology, art, social thought, media studies, and literary theory to piece together a sense of the conceptual possibilities afforded by analytical engagement with the world of things. We will take the historical dynamics of things as our central concern, navigating between classic and contemporary debates over the social location, physical constitution, and agency of object worlds. Along the way we will take in contemporary arguments for objects as constitutive elements of mind, affect, and order. The goal of the course is to juxtapose the experience, perception, and imagination of objects in order to address critical gaps in our understanding of social life past, present, and future. As the second course in a sequence focused on material theory, this seminar is part of a wider effort to train students to be astute analysts of the material world.

  
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    ANTHR 6403 - [Ethnographic Field Methods]


         
    Fall. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4403 .

    V. Santiago-Irizarry.

    This course will provide students with practical understanding about what anthropologists actually do in the field. We will examine problems that emerge in conducting fieldwork that raise ethical, methodological, theoretical, and practical issues in the observation, participation in, recording, and representation of culture(s). Students will be expected to develop a semester-long, local research project that will allow them to experience fieldwork situations.

  
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    ANTHR 6422 - Culture, Politics, and Environment in the Circumpolar North

    (crosslisted) AIIS 6422  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with AIIS 3422 /ANTHR 3422 .

    P. Nadasdy.

    This course examines the cultures and histories of the circumpolar North. The primary emphasis is on the North American Arctic and Subarctic with some attention to northern Eurasia for comparative purposes. The focus is on the indigenous peoples of the region and the socio-political and ecological dimensions of their evolving relationships with southern industrial societies.

  
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    ANTHR 6424 - [Ethnoracial Identity in Anthropology, Language, and Law]

    (crosslisted) AMST 6424 LAW 7231 , LSP 6424  
         
    Spring. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    V. Santiago-Irizarry.

    This course examines the role that both law and language, as mutually constitutive mediating systems, occupy in constructing ethnoracial identity in the United States. We approach the law from a critical anthropological perspective, as a signifying and significant sociocultural system rather than as an abstract collection of rules, norms, and procedures, to examine how legal processes and discourses contribute to processes of cultural production and reproduction that contribute to the creation and maintenance of differential power relations. Course material draws on anthropological, linguistic, and critical race theory as well as ethnographic and legal material to guide and document our analyses.

  
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    ANTHR 6432 - [Hasidism: History, Community, Thought]


         
    Spring. Next offered 2019-2020. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 3432 /JWST 3432 .

    J. Boyarin.

    The modern Jewish religious movement known as Hasidism began in Eastern Europe in the eighteenth century and thrives today.  We will approach Hasidism primarily through three avenues: recent critical social history; selections from Hasidic literature; and ethnographic accounts of Hasidic life today. By the end of the semester, students will be able to articulate some ways that Hasidism reflects both broader trends in European religious and moral thought of its time, and some ways that it represents distinctively Jewish developments. You will also gain a deeper appreciation of the various kinds of evidence and disciplinary approaches that need to be brought to bear on the attempt to articulate as broad, deep and varied a phenomenon as modern Hasidic Judaism. 

  
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    ANTHR 6437 - Global Fantasies, Global Realities, Global Nightmares


         
    Fall. 3 credits. Student option grading.

    Recommended prerequisite: some familiarity with issues and debates in anthropology and/or social sciences generally. Co-meets with ANTHR 3437 .

    M. Fiskesjö, S. Sangren.

    This course offers a synthetic perspective on a spectrum of currently troubling phenomena – the rise of authoritarian populism, growing inequality, racism, misogyny, nationalism, war. In particular, it links macro-scale and historical theories regarding global processes (e.g., “world systems,” “globalization”), on the one hand, and the more intimate correlates of these macro forces shaping individual experience, on the other.  Drawing from anthropology as well as from cognate disciplines (political economy, history, and psychology), the course surveys and assesses both case studies of phenomena such as the self-delusion of the oppressed, the narcissism of dictators, and how the making and remaking of social identities relate to world economic cycles.  Course readings highlight how fantasy, imagination, hope and fear figure crucially in people’s apprehensions of the contemporary world. 

  
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    ANTHR 6440 - Proposal Development


         
    Spring. 4 credits. S/U grades only.

    M. Welker.

    This seminar focuses on preparing a full-scale proposal for anthropological fieldwork for a dissertation. Topics include identifying appropriate funding sources; defining a researchable problem; selecting and justifying a particular fieldwork site; situating the ethnographic case within appropriate theoretical contexts; selecting and justifying appropriate research methodologies; developing a feasible timetable for field research; ethical considerations and human subjects protection procedures; and preparing appropriate budgets. This is a writing seminar, and students will complete a proposal suitable for submission to a major funding agency in the social sciences.

  
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    ANTHR 6450 - [Social Studies of Economics and Finance]


         
    Fall. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    H. Miyazaki.

    This course has two purposes. The first is to examine recent efforts to extend theoretical insights from the social studies of science to studies of the market. The second is to consider the implications of these efforts for anthropological critiques of capitalism and neoliberal reforms. Topics of investigation include the relationship between theory and practice in the market, the emergence of risk as a calculable entity and the place of the category of the social in knowledge about the market.

  
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    ANTHR 6456 - [Comparative Diasporas]

    (crosslisted) JWST 6556 , NES 6556  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2019-2020. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 3456 /JWST 3556 /NES 3556 .

    J. Boyarin.

    The course begins with review of certain recent theories of diaspora, especially by anthropologists, and then contrasts the diaspora form of social organization to the nation-state. The rest of the semester is taken up with readings in some of the classic ancient and modern diasporas, such as the East Asian, Roma-Sinta (Gypsy), African, Palestinian and Jewish, with special references to the mutual shaping of diasporic populations and their religious engagements. Throughout the course, we will be attentive to the recent shift in scholarly and theoretical discourses from a view of diaspora as pathological or abnormal to a view of diaspora as a risky, yet creative and fruitful relation between politics and culture.

  
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    ANTHR 6460 - Language Ideologies and Practices

    (crosslisted) LSP 6460  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    V. Santiago-Irizarry.

    Cultural identity and citizenship in the United States have often been organized around linguistic difference and the issues this raises in an English-dominant society. Drawing from anthropological theories on language, this course will look at the place of language as a signifying practice in the United States by focusing on the experience of Latino communities. Topics to be explored include linguistic diversity and change, accommodation and resistance, language maintenance and shift, linguistic ideologies, the production of language hierarchies, and institutional applications of language.

  
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    ANTHR 6465 - [Bodies and Bodiliness]

    (crosslisted) STS 6460  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2019-2020. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    S. Langwick.

    This course examines a range of texts that treat the body as the subject and object of cultural, technological, political, and ethical processes. Students investigate the cultivation of physical and social bodies through ethnographic and historical materials concerning healing and medicine, discipline and labor, governance and religion, aesthetics and desire. The production and reproduction of bodies and embodied practices have long been central to the way that power works. In this class, we will read and discuss a range of approach to the body. There is much contention over how work, politics, environment, technologies, and violence shape the body and the senses. We will debate how histories of the body are intertwined with histories of gender, race, class, sexuality, (post)coloniality, modernization, science, transnationalism, and the webs of institution, ideas, and capital that comprise these phenomena. Some readings will investigate the complex mediations that account for the body as icon, text, metaphor, commodity, and raw material. Others will contend that serious attention to the production and reproduction of the body across different times and spaces challenge traditional notions of materiality and physicality. Because every examination of the body rests-implicitly or explicitly-in a theoretical and methodological approach to experience, we will also explore the histories of bodily senses, appetites, and capabilities. Ultimately, our inquiry into contests over and reflections on “the body,” as well as specific bodies, aims to open up broader anthropological questions about authority, agency, sovereignties, and material life.

  
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    ANTHR 6475 - Culture, Language, and Thought


         
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 3479 .

    V. Santiago-Irizarry.

    The relationship among culture, language, and thought has been a core concern in many disciplines. Anthropology among them offers a particularly productive perspective for considering this concern. Language and culture are commonly defined as processes that are public and shared yet they also operate within and upon subliminal experiential realms. In this course we shall examine how anthropologists have explored this relationship, which is engendered in the interaction between culture and language as parallel mediating devices for the constitution, interpretation, and expression of human thought and experience.

  
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    ANTHR 6482 - Perspectives on the Nation


         
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    V. Munasinghe.

    This course will critically examine the key texts that have informed our understanding of the nation and nationalism. Beginning with some of the founding texts such as Hahn Kohn’s “The Idea of Nationalism: A Study in its Origins and Backgrounds” (1994), Plamenatz’s “Two Types of Nationalism” (1976), and Renan’s “What is a Nation” (1939), we will then move on to more contemporary writings by Gellner, Hobsbawm and Anderson and end with alternate analytical approaches that have been informed by the “national question” in the “Third World” such as Partha Chatterjee’s “Nationalist Thought and the Colonial World.” A central theme will be how notions of culture, power, and history are implicated in constructions of “the Nation.” We will also explore the possibilities of an ethnographic approach to the nation and ask if such an analytical/methodological move may help us better grapple with the perplexing emotive dimension of nationalisms. The intersection of gender and nation will also form a section of this course.

  
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    ANTHR 6516 - [Power, Society, and Culture in Southeast Asia]


         
    Fall. Next offered 2019-2020. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 3516 .

    M. Welker.

    Examining the symbolic within cultural and social processes in Southeast Asia, anthropologists have produced contextually rich accounts of cultural uniqueness. Interpretive ethnographies tend, however, to downplay the role of power and domination. Using the traditional strengths of symbolic anthropology, this course examines how ritual, art, religion, and “traditional” values in contemporary Southeast Asian societies have been shaped by colonialism, war, nationalism, colonialism and socialism, and play a role in structuring ethnic, class, and gender inequalities. In addition to providing a broad and comparative ethnographic survey of Southeast Asia, this course investigates how culturally-specific forms of power and domination are reflected in national politics, and in local and regional responses to the economic and cultural forces of globalization.

  
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    ANTHR 6520 - Kingship and State-Making in Asia

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 6530 , ASIAN 6652  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Recommended prerequisite: some foundation in either Asian anthropology, archaeology, or history. Co-meets with ANTHR 3520 /ARKEO 3520 /ASIAN 3362 .

    M. Fiskesjö

    Kingship plays an outsize role in Asian countries today, in both democratic and authoritarian countries. Even in countries that abolished the monarchy, the legacy of kingship is very much at play. In this course we will study Asia’s kingdoms, states, and empires, with attention to both tradition and present-day modern states. Focusing on kingship as both ideology and practice, we will study how states and monarchic traditions first came to be, including as Stranger-Kings, Buddhist monarchs, secondary state formation, local adaptations of foreign models, and more. We will examine examples such as China, from the ancient states and early empires to the legacy of empire there today; Cambodia and its Angkor empire modeled on Indian traditions; as well as Burma, Thailand, Japan, and other parts of Asia. Using readings, films, lectures and guest presentations, we will re-examine the role of kingship in Asia so as to enable a new understanding of both ancient, historical, and contemporary Asia. 

  
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    ANTHR 6614 - Marginal Archaeology: Liminality and the Power of Borders in the Maritime Past

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 6614 , NES 4914  
    (CU-ITL)     
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4614 /ARKEO 4614 /NES 4914 .

    C. Monroe.

    For description, see NES 6914 .

  
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    ANTHR 6633 - [New Directions in Near Eastern Archaeology]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 6633 NES 6633  
    (CU-ITL)     
    Fall. Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4633 /ARKEO 4633 /NES 4633 .

    L. Khatchadourian.

    For description, see NES 6633 .

  
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    ANTHR 6703 - Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective


         
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 3703 /AAS 3030 .

    V. Munasinghe.

    The common perception of ethnicity is that it is a “natural” and an inevitable consequence of cultural difference. “Asians” overseas, in particular, have won repute as a people who cling tenaciously to their culture and refuse to assimilate into their host societies and cultures. But, who are the “Asians?” On what basis can we label “Asians” an ethnic group? Although there is a significant Asian presence in the Caribbean, the category “Asian” itself does not exist in the Caribbean. What does this say about the nature of categories that label and demarcate groups of people on the basis of alleged cultural and phenotypical characteristics? This course will examine the dynamics behind group identity, namely ethnicity, by comparing and contrasting the multicultural experience of Asian populations in the Caribbean and the United States. Ethnographic case studies will focus on the East Indian and Chinese experiences in the Caribbean and the Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Filipino, and Indian experiences in the United States.

  
  
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    ANTHR 6738 - [Networks in Archaeology]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 6738 , CLASS 6738 , NES 6638  
         
    Spring. Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    A. Van Oyen.

    For description, see CLASS 6738 .

  
  
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    ANTHR 6890 - [Collapse of the Secular Future]

    (crosslisted) COML 6893 , GERST 6490 , JWST 6990 , NES 6990     
         
    Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    J. Boyarin, P. Fleming.

    For description, see GERST 6490 

  
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    ANTHR 7010 - [Engaged Anthropology of the Contemporary]


         
    Fall. Next offered 2020-2021. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Enrollment limited to: graduate students.

    S. Hodžić.

    This course asks how anthropologists articulate the relevance of our work in theoretical and political terms by staging an encounter between three disparate strands of scholarship: anthropology of the contemporary, engaged/public anthropology, and anthropology of everyday violence and ordinary affects. Designed to bring together pre-fieldwork and post-fieldwork graduate students, this seminar functions as a laboratory for expanding existing conversations and exploring further articulations of engaged anthropology of the contemporary. Participants will reflect on how their political commitments, ethnographic and other sensibilities, and theoretical perspectives inform each other, and will invigorate their research design, writing, and analytical frameworks in light of these reflections and engagement with course texts. The course is open to students from across the disciplines.

  
  
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    ANTHR 7045 - Ethical Issues in Archaeology

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 7045  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Enrollment limited to: graduate students. Co-meets with ANTHR 4045 /ARKEO 4045 .

    D. Bardolph.

    How might archaeology contribute to a more humane world? Recognizing that archaeology is an inherently political activity, we will examine and actively debate some of the major ethical issues that confront practitioners navigating the complex responsibilities, roles, and praxis associated with archaeology. We will consider the multiple stakeholders in the archaeological endeavor—students, professional colleagues, public land managers, avocationalists, collectors, members of local communities, members of descendant communities, and so forth. Topics to be addressed include professional codes of archaeological ethics; equity and safety issues in archaeology; approaches to cultural resource and heritage management; the antiquities trade; and collaboration and community engagement. This course will involve active debate of ethical issues in archaeology, including case studies for the 2018 Society for American Archaeology Ethics Bowl.

  
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    ANTHR 7113 - [Archaeology of the Everyday: The Near East and Beyond]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 7113 , NES 6613  
    (CU-ITL)     
    Fall. Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4113 /ARKEO 4113 /NES 4613 .

    L. Khatchadourian.

    For description, see NES 6613 .

  
  
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    ANTHR 7209 - [Approaches to Archaeology]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 7209  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4209 /ARKEO 4209 .

    K. Jordan.

    This seminar explores the theoretical models and concepts that have shaped modern archaeology.  Students will examine the history of theoretical orientations in archaeology, and consider the variety of interpretive frameworks that guide contemporary research.  Readings and discussions will explore culture-historical, processual, post-processual, Marxian, Darwinian, feminist, cognitive, and indigenous perspectives and examine the politics of archaeological research.  This seminar is especially recommended for graduate archaeologists and undergraduate Anthropology and Archaeology majors.

  
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    ANTHR 7213 - [Archaeology of Eurasia: The Caucasus, Steppe, and Central Asia]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 7213  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2021-2022. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: previous course in archaeology at the 1000 or 2000 level. Co-meets with ANTHR 4213 /ARKEO 4213 .

    A. T. Smith.

    This course explores the prehistory and early history of the central Eurasian Steppe, Central Asia, and the Caucasus from the appearance of the first settled villages during the Neolithic through the rise of Eurasian Empires. The goal of the course is to provide students with an overview of the archaeological record and an understanding of the history of research in the area. Throughout, we will be concerned to address four key conceptual issues: 1) social and political relationships between hunting and gathering, agricultural, and pastoral societies; 2) large-scale migrations and long-distance contacts; 3) the impact of technological innovations (e.g., horse domestication, metallurgy) on social transformations; and 4) the interchanges between Eurasian societies and surrounding regions of eastern Europe, southwest Asia and Central Asia.

  
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    ANTHR 7220 - [Inkas and their Empire]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 7220  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2020-2021. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4220 /ARKEO 4220 .

    J. Henderson.

    In little more than a century the Inkas created an empire stretching thousands of kilometers along the Andean spine from Ecuador to Chile. This course focuses on the political and economic structure of the empire and on its roots in earlier Andean prehistory. Archaeological remains, along with documents produced in the aftermath of the Spanish invasion, will be used to trace the history of Inka territorial organization, statecraft, and economic relationships and the Colonial transformation of Andean societies.

  
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    ANTHR 7227 - [Embodiment of Inequality: A Bioarchaeological Perspective]

    (crosslissted) ARKEO 7227  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4227 /ARKEO 4227 .

    M. Velasco.

    Critical approaches to embodiment compel bioarchaeologists to consider how social norms and institutional inequalities are enacted and materialized through the body. This course contributes a deep archaeological perspective on the lived experience of inequality and the historically contingent nature of sexuality, gender, and violence. Drawing upon the study of human skeletons, social theory, and a rich comparative literature in cultural anthropology, we will “put flesh on the bones” and explore topics such as body modification and mutilation; masculinity and performative violence; sexuality and ‘third gender’; and sickness and suffering in past societies. We will not only consider privilege and marginalization in lived experience, but also in death, examining how unequal social relationships are reproduced when the dead body is colonized as an object of study.

  
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    ANTHR 7230 - [History of Archaeological Thought]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 7230  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2021-2022. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4230 /ARKEO 4230 .

    A. T. Smith.

    This course examines the history of archaeological interpretation and representation. Through an immersion in various genres of thought and writing, we will chart the historical development of archaeology as it has been transformed from inception to today. The course is organized into two concurrent parts. The first provides an intensive overview of the dominant positions and problems in modern archaeological theory. In this section of the course, we will explore the major historical movements in archaeological interpretation since the formalization of the discipline in the 19th century through the contemporary constellation of thematic concerns. It is in these discussions that we will strive to bring forward the subtle logics that underlie archaeological analysis. The second section of the course centers on an exploration of archaeological representation and overlapping issues raised in the sister field of historiography. In this section of the course we will discuss general issues in the philosophy of history as they bear upon the production of landmark archaeological studies, engaging with a series of pivotal research projects. By the end of the course, students should have a thorough understanding of the theoretical frameworks that underlie contemporary archaeological research and the unique problems that follow efforts to interpret and represent the archaeological record.

  
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    ANTHR 7235 - [Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 7235  
         
    Spring. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4235 /ARKEO 4235 .

    F. Gleach.

    “Res ipsa loquitur” – the thing speaks for itself. This common expression captures a widespread belief about objects’ roles in human lives, but “hearing” what objects have to say is actually a complex cultural process. An object rarely has a single meaning; they are read variously in different cultural settings, and even by different individuals within a cultural system. How does one know – can one know – the meanings of an object? How are objects strategically deployed in social interaction (particularly in cross-cultural interactions, where each side may have radically different understandings)? How does one even know what an object is? We will explore the history and variety of ways that material culture and its meanings have been studied, using archaeological and ethnographic examples.

  
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    ANTHR 7240 - Collecting Culture: Museums and Anthropology

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 7240  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4240 /ARKEO 4240 .

    F. Gleach.

    Ethnographic and archaeological objects are widely collected, by individuals and by institutions. This course will explore the history and processes of museums and collecting, and issues around working with collections. We will work with materials in the Anthropology Collections, and also draw on other resources on campus and in the area to experience a variety of ways that museums and collections are organized, maintained, conceptualized and presented. We also will consider challenges to collecting, such as its implication in nationalist and imperialist agendas, the problems of archaeological looting and ethnographic appropriation, and indigenous expectations and demands for inclusion in such activities.

  
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    ANTHR 7246 - Human Osteology

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 7246  
         
    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Recommended prerequisite: ANTHR 6235 . Co-meets with ANTHR 4246 /ARKEO 4246 .

    M. Velasco.

    This is an intensive laboratory course in the study of human skeletal remains. A detailed knowledge of skeletal anatomy is fundamental to forensic anthropology, bioarchaeology, and the medical sciences. This course teaches students how to identify all 206 bones and 32 teeth of the human skeleton, in both complete and fragmentary states. Students will also learn osteological methods for establishing a biological profile (age-at-death, sex, stature, and biological affinity) and documenting skeletal trauma and pathological lesions. Hands-on laboratory training will be supplemented by case studies that demonstrate the importance of human osteology for criminal investigations in the present and the study of health and violence in the past. The ethics of working with human remains are also discussed.

  
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    ANTHR 7250 - Time and History in Ancient Mexico

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 7250 , LATA 7250  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4256 /ARKEO 4256 /LATA 4250 .

    J. Henderson.

    Explores the ways Mesoamericans understood the world and their place in it, and the ways they constructed history as these are reflected in the few books that have survived from the period before the European invasion. Examines the structure of writing and systems of notation, especially calendars, and considers their potential for illuminating Mesoamerican world views and approaches to history.  Primary focus is detailed analysis of five precolumbian books: Codex Borgia, a central Mexican manual of divinatory ritual; Codex Boturini, a history of migration in central Mexico; Codex Nuttall, a Mixtec dynastic history; and two Maya books of astrology and divination, Codex Dresden and Codex Madrid.

  
  
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    ANTHR 7256 - [Ancient Civilizations of the Andes]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 7256 , LATA 7256  
         
    Spring. Next offered 2019-2020. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 3256 /ARKEO 3256 /LATA 3256 .

    J. Henderson.

    This course asks how anthropologists articulate the relevance of our work in theoretical and political terms by staging an encounter between three disparate strands of scholarship: anthropology of the contemporary, engaged/public anthropology, and anthropology of everyday violence and ordinary affects. Designed to bring together pre-fieldwork and post-fieldwork graduate students, this seminar functions as a laboratory for expanding existing conversations and exploring further articulations of engaged anthropology of the contemporary. Participants will reflect on how their political commitments, ethnographic and other sensibilities, and theoretical perspectives inform each other, and will invigorate their research design, writing, and analytical frameworks in light of these reflections and engagement with course texts. The course is open to students from across the disciplines.

  
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    ANTHR 7263 - [Zooarchaeological Method]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 7263  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2019-2020. 5 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4263 /ARKEO 4263 .

    N. Russell.

    This is a hands-on laboratory course in zooarchaeological method: the study of animal bones from archaeological sites.  It is designed to provide students with a basic grounding in identification of body part and taxon, aging and sexing, pathologies, taphonomy, and human modification.  The course will deal only with mammals larger than squirrels.  While students will work on animal bones from prehistoric Europe, most of these skills are easily transferable to the fauna of other areas, especially North America.  This is an intensive course that emphasizes laboratory skills in a realistic setting.  Students will analyze an assemblage of actual archaeological bones.  It is highly recommended that students also take the course in Zooarchaeological Interpretation (ANTHR 7264 /ARKEO 7264 ) offered in the spring.

  
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    ANTHR 7264 - [Zooarchaeological Interpretation]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 7264  
         
    Spring. Next offered 2019-2020. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Prerequisite: ANTHR 7263 , ARKEO 7263 . Permission of instructor required. Co-meets with ANTHR 4264 /ARKEO 4264 .

    N. Russell.

    This course is intended to follow on from Zooarchaeological Method in the fall; it is assumed that students have some familiarity with the nature of zooarchaeological material.  In this course, we will consider issues related to the interpretation of archaeological animal bones: quantification, seasonality, taphonomy, subsistence, the origins of hunting, animal domestication, modes of consumption, meat sharing, the use of secondary products (milk, wool, traction).

  
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    ANTHR 7268 - [Aztecs and Their Empire: Myth, History, and Politics]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 7268  
         
    Spring. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4268 /ARKEO 4268 .

    J. Henderson.

    Examines the structure and history of the largest polity in ancient Mexico, the “empire” of the Aztecs, using descriptions left by Spanish invaders, accounts written by Aztecs under Colonial rule, and archaeological evidence. Explores Aztec visions of the past, emphasizing the roles of myth, religion, and identity in Aztec statecraft and the construction of history.

  
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    ANTHR 7272 - [Archaeology of Colonialism and Cultural Entanglement]

    (crosslisted) AIIS 7720 AMST 6272 , ARKEO 7272  
         
    Spring. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with AIIS 4720 /AMST 4272 /ANTHR 4272 /ARKEO 4272 .

    K. Jordan.

    This seminar uses archaeology to examine engagements between settlers and indigenous peoples throughout world history. Archaeology provides a perspective on settler-indigenous encounters that both supplements and challenges conventional models.  We will assess the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of cultural engagement, examine methodologies, and explore a series of archaeological case studies, using examples from both the ancient world and the European expansion over the past 600 years. The seminar provides a comparative perspective on indigenous-colonial relationships, in particular exploring the hard-fought spaces of relative autonomy created and sustained by indigenous peoples. 

  
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    ANTHR 7402 - [Anthropology of Education]

    (crosslisted) EDUC 7402  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4402 /EDUC 4402 .

    S. Villenas.

    This seminar examines public schools and other educational spaces as sites where knowledge, learning/learner, and identities are produced and contested. It explores how power and cultural norms work in educational settings, and the unintended teaching and learning that happens outside the purported curriculum. Topics include issues of multiculturalism and pluralism in schools and society, the school achievement of racial/ethnic minorities, youth cultures and identities, and literacy in adult learning spaces. This course is for students interested in the advanced study of multicultural schooling and education.

  
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    ANTHR 7409 - Qualitative Methods in the Social Sciences


         
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4409 .

    S. Villenas.

    This course is an introduction to the practice and conceptual foundations of qualitative research methods in the social sciences. Students will learn different approaches with the opportunity to experience the practical dimensions of conducting a qualitative study, including research design, participant observation, interviewing, discourse analysis, and narrative inquiry. In the process, we will explore the principles, theories and epistemologies informing various paradigms in qualitative research. What does it mean to do interpretive research? What do feminist and critical ethnographies look like? What are critical race methodologies? What does it mean to think with performativity, power, deconstruction, desire or decoloniality? We will also examine dilemmas and issues concerning ethics, informed consent, researcher positionality and relationships, and writing and reporting.

  
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    ANTHR 7410 - [Indigenous Peoples, Ecological Sciences, and Environmentalism]


         
    Spring. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4410 .

    P. Nadasdy.

    This course examines the long, complex, and ambivalent relationship among indigenous peoples (with an emphasis on the North American context), scientific ecology, and environmentalism. It begins by looking at the key role played by images of the “ecologically noble savage” in the historical development of the ecological sciences and the environmental movement. It then turns to an in-depth examination of several historical and ethnographic case studies in an effort to understand how the entanglement of indigenous peoples, environmental activists, and ecological scientists have shaped-and continue to shape-environmental politics and struggles over indigenous rights.

  
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    ANTHR 7413 - Walter Benjamin

    (crosslisted) GERST 6413 , JWST 7913 , NES 7913  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4413 /COML 4429 /GERST 4413 /JWST 4913 /NES 4913 .

    J. Boyarin.

    This extraordinary figure died in 1941, and his death is emblematic of the intellectual depradations of Nazism. Yet since World War II, his influence, his reputation, and his fascination for scholars in a wide range of cultural and political disciplines has steadily grown. He is seen as a bridging figure between German and Jewish studies, between materialist critique of culture and the submerged yet powerful voice of theology, between literary history and philosophy. We will review Benjamin’s life and some of the key disputes over his heritage; read some of the best-known of his essays; and devote significant time to his enigmatic and enormously rich masterwork, the Arcades Project, concluding with consideration of the relevance of Benjamin’s insights for cultural and political dilemmas today.

  
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    ANTHR 7418 - Writing Ethnography: Theory, Genre and Practice


         
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4418 .

    L. Ramberg.

    What are the poetics and politics of ethnographic writing? How is this genre, what many would call the signature of cultural anthropology, distinct from other modes of scholarly writing? What are its possibilities, limits and effects? In this course we will read classic and experimental ethnographies and undertake exercises in ethnographic writing as a means to investigate ethnography as epistemology, genre and craft.

  
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    ANTHR 7419 - [Anthropology of Corporations]


         
    Fall. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4419 .

    M. Welker.

    This course develops an anthropological approach to corporations with a focus on large, profit-oriented, publicly-traded corporations. To denaturalize the corporation, we will consider competing cultural logics internal to corporations as well as the contingent historical processes and debates that shaped the corporate form over the past two centuries. The course will examine processes through which various social groups have sought to alter and restrain corporations as well as reciprocal corporate attempts to reshape the social environment in which they operate.

  
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    ANTHR 7422 - Advanced Topic in the Anthropology of Law

    (crosslisted) LAW 7081  
         
    Spring. 3 credits. Letter grades only.

    A. Riles.

    For description, see LAW 7081 .

  
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    ANTHR 7425 - Hope and Futurity


         
    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4425 .

    H. Miyazaki.

    What is hope? How is hope produced and lost? How is hope distributed in society? What role does hope play in the production of knowledge, imagination and belief? In this course, we will investigate these questions through a close examination of a full range of anthropological, sociological, literary, philosophical and religious explorations into hope and futurity.

  
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    ANTHR 7435 - Postcolonial Science


         
    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4435 /BSOC 4351 /STS 4351 .

    S. Langwick.

    This course examines science and technology in so-called “non-Western” countries as well as the ways that science and technology are shaping new “transnational” or “global” relations. We will explore the post-colonial as a dynamic space that both plays off of and refigures the complicated dynamics of colonialism. The postcolonial challenges the dichotomies through which colonial power moved: western/indigenous, white/black, modern/traditional, global/local, developed/underdeveloped, and science/non-science. At the same time, it confronts the ways in which colonial histories are still embodied in institutions, identities, environments, and landscapes. Techno-scientific knowledge and practice have both enacted colonial divisions and been called on in post-colonial struggles. How them might we understand the work of scientific knowledge and practice in the kinds of hegemonies and struggles that shape our world today? We will explore this question by examining the way that technoscience is performed-by scientists, development workers, activists, government officials, and others. The class will pay particular attention to the located processes through which claims to the universal or global emerge. In addition by considering controversies over the environment, medicine, and indigenous knowledge, we will consider the effects of such claims.

  
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    ANTHR 7437 - [Development, Humanitarianism, and the Will to Improve]


         
    Fall. Next offered 2019-2020. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4437 .

    M. Welker.

    This seminar develops an ethnographic approach to projects aiming to improve the human condition. Our object of study - development, humanitarianism, and the will to improve - is defined capaciously to allow for the study of projects ranging in orientation from politically conservative to progressive and revolutionary; from religious to secular; and from the global South to the global North. Whether we are studying construction megaprojects or hygiene lessons, programs for preserving tradition or introducing modernity, climate change mitigation efforts or truth commissions, we will explore ethnographically the actors, targets, explicit motives, practical techniques, and intended and unintended consequences. Our aim will be to link the micropolitics of lived experience and intersubjective relations to the macropolitics that structure and enable improvement projects.

  
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    ANTHR 7444 - [God(s) and the Market]


         
    Fall. Next offered 2020-2021. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4444 .

    H. Miyazaki.

    One of the oldest and most powerful insights of anthropology is that different domains of society such as religion and economy shape and condition each other. We will discuss a variety of old and new anthropological explorations into the intersections of religion and economy, from Max Weber’s classical study of the relationship between Protestantism and the rise of capitalism to recent studies of the work of faith in financial markets. This seminar is intended to bring together students interested in religion and students interested in business and economy.

  
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    ANTHR 7453 - [Political Anthropology]


         
    Spring. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4453 .

    A. T. Smith.

    This course is an exploration of major theoretical approaches to the study of political institutions, structures, and processes in different societies, with special reference to the nature of power, the role of symbolism and ideology in politics, the problem of sovereignty, and representations of the state. We will explore the constitution of political authority in reference to both ethnographic and archaeological investigations that will take us from the problems of early state origins to the transformations of the post-colonial. Throughout, our discussions will attempt to bring forward problems of structure and process, history and practice that animate anthropological approaches to political life.

  
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    ANTHR 7456 - [Secularism and Political Theology]

    (crosslisted) JWST 7456  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4456 /JWST 4456 /RELST 4456 .

    J. Boyarin.

    This seminar will examine the concepts of secularism and political theology, and along with them the notion of religion itself.   Our readings—which include theoretical and historical overviews, as well as case studies—will allow us to examine several key questions.  Among them are: Does secularism have a substantive content, or is it merely what fills the void where religious traditions retreat? Is secularism a specifically Western project, or are secularisms produced independently in different parts of the world? Does greater secularism lead to increased tolerance? What is the relation between nationalism, statism, and the ideologies usually associated with religion or “theology?”  Is a secular state really possible? How will our notions of “religion” change after these careful considerations of religion’s constitutive outside?

  
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    ANTHR 7458 - Women, Girls and Gender in Education

    (crosslisted) EDUC 7458 , FGSS 7458  
         
    Fall. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4458 /EDUC 4458 /FGSS 4458 .

    S. Villenas.

    This seminar explores and compares the educational and schooling experiences of young women and girls through an array of ethnographic studies conducted in different regions of the world. Drawing on the fields of anthropology of education and feminist studies, we examine how girls and young women construct gender identities and ways of knowing through prisms of race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, language, nation and citizenship. Second, we inquire into how gendered notions of development and state sanctioned forms of structural and symbolic violence, impact young women’s educational experiences and opportunities, and how they in turn respond. Lastly, we consider young women as learners who craft their own lives and literacies across borders and diverse spaces of home, school, community, and peer group.

  
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    ANTHR 7460 - Heritage and its Entanglements: Representing, Collecting, and Preserving Cultural Identity

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 7460  
         
    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4460 /ARKEO 4460 .

    J. Henderson, C. Klimaszewski.

    An exploration of the ways that cultural heritage is embodied in things, particularly archaeological landscapes, sites, and artifacts.   Identifying stakeholders in relation to collecting and controlling these things and representing heritage is a key focus:  what voices should states and other political entities have?  local residents? descendants?  How should descendants be identified?  Other key topics include looting and the market in smuggled antiquities; repatriation; the ethics of studying and publishing looted objects; community engagement; forces that destroy heritage and strategies for preserving it; re-invented and imagined heritage.  These issues will be examined using the collections of the Johnson Museum of Art and through case studies, including Colonial Williamsburg, African Burial Ground, Harriet Tubman House, the ancient Maya, and archaeology in the Third Reich.

  
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    ANTHR 7462 - [Politics Beyond the State: Activism, Advocacy, and NGOs]


         
    Spring. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4462 .

    S. Hodžić.

    What is left of politics? The answer to this question takes somewhat hopeful contours, if we look at politics in spaces that are not fully captured by state institutions, the traditionally conceived public sphere, or “traditional” authorities. We will read ethnographies that reconceptualize both the political and the scales of situated analysis in a global world. These ethnographies explore movements that declare themselves political (social movements, anarchism, and some forms of feminist activism), examine the grey zones of human rights advocacy, humanitarianism, and biopolitics, point to transnational governmentality and transformations of sovereignty and citizenship in development and NGOs projects often theorized as anti-political, and reveal the configurations of street and subterranean politics, where the subaltern voices are rarely heard in their own right.

  
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    ANTHR 7467 - Self and Subjectivity


         
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4467 .

    A. Willford.

    This course examines theories of subjectivity and self-formation from a comparative, ethnographic perspective. We begin by examining classic and contemporary phenomenological, psychodynamic, semiotic, structuralist, and post-structuralist theories of self and/or subject formation. Moving into the ethnographic literature, we assess the utility of these models for understanding the selves of others, particularly in critical juxtaposition to multiple and alternate theories of the self and/or person as understood in different cultures. By examining debates in the anthropology of emotion, cognition, healing, and mental health we bring into sharper focus the particular theoretical and empirical contributions (and/or limits and failures) of anthropologists towards developing a cross-cultural psychology.

  
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    ANTHR 7479 - [Ethnicity and Identity Politics: An Anthropological Perspective]

    (crosslisted) AAS 7479  
         
    Spring. Next offered 2019-2020. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with AAS 4790 /ANTHR 4479 .

    V. Munasinghe.

    The most baffling aspect of ethnicity is that while ethnic sentiments and movements gain ground rapidly within the international arena, the claim that ethnicity does not exist in any objective sense is also receiving increasing credence within the academic community. How can something thought “not to exist” have such profound consequences in the real world? In lay understandings, ethnicity is believed to be a “natural” disposition of humanity. If so, why does ethnicity mean different “things” in different places? Anthropology has much to contribute to a greater understanding of this perplexing phenomenon. After all, the defining criterion for ethnic groups is that of cultural distinctiveness. Through ethnographic case studies, this course will examine some of the key anthropological approaches to ethnicity. We will explore the relationship of ethnicity to culture, ethnicity to nation, and ethnicity to state to better understand the role ethnicity plays in the identity politics of today.

  
  
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    ANTHR 7513 - Religion and Politics in Southeast Asia

    (crosslisted) ASIAN 7713  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4513 /ASIAN 4413 .

    A. Willford.

    This course investigates the extent to which religious beliefs and practices in Southeast Asia have been transformed by the combined forces of colonialism, nationalism, and globalization.  By examining diversity, difference, and resurgence in one of the world’s most rapidly changing regions, we aim to understand the economic, social, and political conditions contributing to the popularity and resurgence of religious ideologies and contemporary movements.  At the same time, we also consider closely the unique ideological, theological, and cultural understandings that shape different religions and movements.  Through this process we also rethink conceptions of modernity as both a cultural and social force.  One key aim of this course will be to analyze the relationships between state-sponsored “official nationalisms,” religious ideologies and practices, and changing socioeconomic conditions.  In doing so, we also aim to better understand the forces behind and implications of heightened ethnic sentiments and violence in the region, as well as changing gender ideologies.

  
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    ANTHR 7520 - Southeast Asia: Readings in Special Problems


         
    Fall, spring. 1-4 credits, variable. Student option grading.

    Staff.

    Independent reading course on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

  
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    ANTHR 7530 - South Asia: Readings in Special Problems


         
    Fall, spring. 1-4 credits, variable. Student option grading.

    Staff.

    Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

  
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    ANTHR 7540 - Problems in Himalayan Studies


         
    Fall, spring. 1-4 credits, variable. Student option grading.

    Staff.

    Independent reading course on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

  
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    ANTHR 7550 - East Asia: Readings in Special Problems


         
    Fall, spring. 1-4 credits, variable. Student option grading.

    Staff.

    Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

  
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    ANTHR 7553 - Traditional China


         
    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4553 .

    S. Sangren.

    This course develops an integrative approach to anthropological theory by means of an intensive examination of local life in China. Among the linked topics are family and kinship, local identity, ritual, cultural constructions of space and time, gender, ideology, and “modes of production of desire.” Its primary objective is to illustrate the advantages of a broadly synthetic approach to socio-cultural anthropology by means of a close analytical examination of elements of local social life. In theoretical terms, the course advocates an accommodation among historical, psychoanalytic, and Marxian perspectives.

  
  
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    ANTHR 7673 - [Body/Politics/Africa]

    (crosslisted) ASRC 7673  
         
    Fall. Next offered 2020-2021. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4673 /ASRC 4673 .

    S. Langwick.

    This course examines a range of texts that treat the body as the subject and object of social, cultural, and historical processes in Africa. Students investigate the cultivation of physical and social bodies through ethnographic and historical materials concerning healing and medicine, discipline and labor, and governance and religion. The production and reproduction of bodies and embodied practices have long been central to the way that power works in and beyond Africa. Our inquiry into contests over and reflections on African bodies opens up important questions about authority, resistance, agency and autonomy.

  
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    ANTHR 7682 - Healing and Medicine in Africa

    (crosslisted) ASRC 7682 , BSOC 7682  
         
    Spring. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Enrollment limited to: graduate students. Co-meets with ANTHR 4682 /ASRC 4682 /BSOC 4682 .

    S. Langwick.

    Healing and medicine are simultaneously individual and political, biological and cultural. In this class, we will study the expansion of biomedicine in Africa, the continuities and changes embodied in traditional medicine, and the relationship between medicine, science and law. We will explore the questions African therapeutics poses about the intimate ways that power works on and through bodies. Our readings will frame current debates around colonial and postcolonial forms of governance through medicine, the contradictions of humanitarianism and the health “crisis” in Africa, and the rise of new forms of “therapeutic citizenship.” We will examine the ways in which Africa is central to the biopolitics of the contemporary global order.

  
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    ANTHR 7725 - [American Indian Lands and Sovereignties]


         
    Spring. Next offered 2019-2020. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4725 .

    P. Nadasdy.

    The relationship between North American Indian peoples and the states of Canada and the US is in many ways unique, the product of centuries of trade compacts, treaties, legislation, warfare, land claim negotiations, and Supreme Court (both US and Canadian) decisions. Those trying to make sense of the cross-cultural terrain of Indian-State relations find that apparently straightforward political and legal concepts such as “land,” “property,” “sovereignty,” and “identity” often seem inadequate, based as they are on European cultural assumptions. These terms tend to take on new - and often ambiguous - meanings in the realm of Indian-State relations. In the first part of this course, we will explore some of these ambiguous meanings, paying attention to the cultural realities they reflect and the social relationships they help shape. In the second part of the course, we will get a sense of the complex interplay of legal, political, and cultural forces discussed earlier in the semester by taking an in-depth look at several selected case studies.

  
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    ANTHR 7742 - [Research Methods in Archaeology]

    (crosslisted) ARKEO 7742 , ARTH 6252 , CLASS 7742  
         
    Spring. Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    S. Manning.

    For description, see CLASS 7742 .

  
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    ANTHR 7745 - Colonial Intersections: Jews and Native Americans

    (crosslisted) JWST 7745 , NES 7745  
         
    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Co-meets with AMST 4740 /ANTHR 4745 /JWST 4745 /NES 4745 .

    J. Boyarin, C. Uran.

    The colonial expansion of Christian Europe continues to leave its mark on the world of the twenty-first century. Two of the peoples caught up in that colonial project, in very different ways, are Jews and Native Americans. Indeed, these two groups were often conflated in the colonial imagination, with Native Americans imagined as the “lost tribes,” and missionary rhetorics first aimed at Jews (and Muslims) being adapted for Native Americans. This course looks at the differing structural positions of Jews (the “other within” Christian Europe) and Native Americans (the “other without”). It also considers these peoples’ varying responses to colonialism, and their relations with each other, to ask how we can compare forms of difference while retaining the richness of their distinctive formations.  

  
  
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    ANTHR 7810 - [East European Jewish Culture]

    (crosslisted) JWST 7910 , NES 7910  
         
    Spring. Next offered 2018-2019. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Co-meets with ANTHR 4810 /JWST 4910 /NES 4910 .

    J. Boyarin.

    An autonomous, diasporic Jewish culture flourished in Eastern Europe from the early modern period through the mid-twentieth century and beyond. It is the ancestral culture of the vast majority of American Jews today, and thus a major source of American culture more generally. Its productions span the range of the religious and the secular, and trouble those very categories. Its reford constitutes a treasure trove of reflections on universality and particularity, self-determination and domination, the search for individual expression and the call of collective solidarity. This course will draw on a wide range of disciplines (especially anthropology, history, and literary studies) and a wide range of genres (fiction, historiography, autobiography, film) to recapture some sense of the living, dynamic cultural world of East European Jews.

  
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    ANTHR 7900 - Department of Anthropology Colloquium


         
    Fall, spring. 1-4 credits variable. S/U grades only.

    Permission of instructor required. Enrollment limited to: graduate students.

    Staff.

    A bi-weekly series of workshops and lectures on a range of themes in the discipline sponsored by the Department of Anthropology.  Presentations include lectures by invited speakers, debates featuring prominent anthropologists from across the globe, and works in progress presented by anthropology faculty and graduate students.

  
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    ANTHR 7910 - Independent Study: Grad I


         
    Fall, spring. 1-4 credits, variable. Student option grading.

    Enrollment limited to: graduate students.

    Staff.

    Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

  
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    ANTHR 7920 - Independent Study: Grad II


         
    Fall, spring. 1-4 credits, variable. Student option grading.

    Enrollment limited to: graduate students.

    Staff.

    Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

  
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    ANTHR 7930 - Independent Study: Grad III


         
    Fall, spring. 1-4 credits, variable. Student option grading.

    Enrollment limited to: graduate students.

    Staff.

    Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.


ARAB—Arabic

  
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    ARAB 1200 - Intensive Arabic I


    (CU-ITL)     
    Spring. 8 credits. Student option grading.

    M. Younes, staff.

    This course designed for students who are interested in completing Cornell’s Elementary Arabic sequence (ARAB 1201  and ARAB 1202 ) in the spring semester. This will be a useful course for students who miss taking Elementary Arabic I in the fall since the course is not offered in the spring.  Students finishing this course will be in a position to take ARAB 1203 - Intermediate Arabic I .

  
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    ARAB 1201 - Elementary Arabic I

    (crosslisted) ASRC 1201  
    (CU-ITL)     
    Fall, summer. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    B. Alomar, R. Barakat, M. Weatherspoon, M. Younes.

    This two-course sequence assumes no previous knowledge of Arabic and provides a thorough grounding in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It starts with the alphabet and the number system and builds the four skills gradually and systematically through carefully selected and organized materials focusing on specific, concrete and familiar topics such as self identification, family, travel, food, renting an apartment, study, the weather, etc.). These topics are listed in the textbook’s table of contents.  The student who successfully completes the two-course sequence will have mastered about 1000 basic words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations on a limited range of practical topics such as self-identification, family, school, work, the weather, travel, etc., 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 180 words written in Arabic script, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 50-word paragraph in Arabic.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Novice to the Intermediate Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.

  
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    ARAB 1202 - Elementary Arabic II

    (crosslisted) ASRC 1202  
    (CU-ITL)     
    Spring, summer. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Prerequisite: ARAB 1201  or permission of instructor.

    B. Alomar, R. Barakat, M. Weatherspoon, M. Younes.

    This two-course sequence assumes no previous knowledge of Arabic and provides a thorough grounding in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It starts with the alphabet and the number system and builds the four skills gradually and systematically through carefully selected and organized materials focusing on specific, concrete and familiar topics such as self identification, family, travel, food, renting an apartment, study, the weather, etc.). These topics are listed in the textbook’s table of contents.  The student who successfully completes the two-course sequence will have mastered about 1000 basic words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations on a limited range of practical topics such as self-identification, family, school, work, the weather, travel, etc., 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 180 words written in Arabic script, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 50-word paragraph in Arabic.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Novice to the Intermediate Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.

  
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    ARAB 1203 - Intermediate Arabic I

    (crosslisted) ASRC 1203  
    (CA-AS) (CU-ITL)     


    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Prerequisite: one year of Arabic or permission of instructor.

    B. Alomar, R. Barakat, M. Weatherspoon, M. Younes.

    In this two-course sequence learners continue to develop the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing and grammar foundation through the extensive use of graded materials on a wide variety of topics.  While more attention is given to developing native-like pronunciation and to grammatical accuracy than in ARAB 1201  and ARAB 1202 , the main focus of the course will be on encouraging fluency and facility in understanding the language and communicating ideas in it.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence will have mastered over 1500 new words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations related to a wide variety of topics beyond those covered in ARAB 1201  and ARAB 1202 , such as the history and geography of the Arab world, food and health, sports, economic matters, the environment, politics, the Palestine problem, etc. 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 300 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 150-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 1202 .  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Intermediate Mid to the Advanced Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.

     

  
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    ARAB 2201 - Arabic for Heritage Speakers

    (crosslisted) ASRC 2105  
    (GB) (CA-AS) Satisfies Option 1. (CU-ITL)     
    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    M. Younes.

    This course is designed for students who can speak and understand a spoken Arabic dialect (Egyptian, Lebanese, Syrian, Iraqi, etc.) but have little or no knowledge of written Arabic, known as Classical Arabic, Modern Standard Arabic, or Fusha. The focus of the course will be on developing the reading and writing skills through the use of graded, but challenging and interesting materials. As they develop their reading and writing skills, students will be learning about Arab history, society, and culture. Classroom activities will be conducted totally in Arabic. Students will not be expected or pressured to speak in Classical Arabic, but will use their own dialects for speaking purposes. However, one of the main goals of the course will be to help the development of the skills to communicate and understand Educated Spoken Arabic, a form of Arabic that is based on the spoken dialects but uses the educated vocabulary and structures of Fusha.

  
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    ARAB 2202 - Intermediate Arabic II

    (crosslisted) ASRC 2200  
    (GB) (CA-AS) Satisfies Option 1. (CU-ITL)     


    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Prerequisite: ARAB 1203  or permission of instructor.

    B. Alomar, R. Barakat, M. Weatherspoon, M. Younes.

    In this two-course sequence learners continue to develop the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing and grammar foundation through the extensive use of graded materials on a wide variety of topics.  While more attention is given to developing native-like pronunciation and to grammatical accuracy than in ARAB 1201  and ARAB 1202 , the main focus of the course will be on encouraging fluency and facility in understanding the language and communicating ideas in it.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence will have mastered over 1500 new words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations related to a wide variety of topics beyond those covered in ARAB 1201  and ARAB 1202 , such as the history and geography of the Arab world, food and health, sports, economic matters, the environment, politics, the Palestine problem, etc. 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 300 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 150-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 1202 .  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Intermediate Mid to the Advanced Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.

     

  
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    ARAB 2204 - Introduction to Quranic Arabic

    (crosslisted) ASRC 2204 , RELST 2204  
    (GB) (LA-AS) (CU-ITL)     
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Prerequisite: knowledge of Arabic alphabet. Conducted in English. This course does not count toward the language requirement in Arts and Sciences.

    M. Younes.

    This course is designed for students who are interested in reading the language of the Qur’an with accuracy and understanding. The first week (4 classes) will be devoted to an introduction of the history of the Qur’an: the revelation, collection, variant readings, and establishment of an authoritative edition. The last week will be devoted to a general overview of “revisionist” literature on the Qur’an. In the remaining 12 weeks, we will cover all of Part 30 (Juz’ ‘Amma, suuras 78-114) and three suuras of varying length (36, 19, and 12).

  
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    ARAB 3201 - Advanced Arabic I

    (crosslisted) ASRC 3100  
    (GB) (CA-AS) Satisfies Option 1. (CU-ITL)     
    Fall. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Prerequisite: ARAB 2202  or permission of instructor.

    M. Weatherspoon.

    In this two-semester sequence, learners will be introduced to authentic, unedited Arabic language materials ranging from short stories, and poems, to newspaper articles dealing with social,  political,  and cultural issues. Emphasis will be on developing fluency in oral expression through discussions of issues presented in the reading and listening selections. There will be more focus on the development of native-like pronunciation and accurate use of grammatical structures than in the previous four courses. A primary objective of the course is the development of the writing skill through free composition exercises in topics of interest to individual students.  This course starts where ARAB 2202  leaves off and continues the development of the four language skills and grammar foundation using 18 themes, some new and some introduced in previous courses but are presented here at a more challenging level.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence have mastered over 3000 new words and will be able, within context of the 18 new and recycled themes to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations, 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, authentic, unedited passages of up to 400 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 300-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 2202 .  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Advanced Mid to the Superior level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.

  
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    ARAB 3202 - Advanced Arabic II

    (crosslisted) ASRC 3101  
    (GB) (CA-AS) Satisfies Option 1. (CU-ITL)     
    Spring. 4 credits. Student option grading.

    Prerequisite: ARAB 3201  or permission of instructor.

    M. Weatherspoon.

    In this two-semester sequence, learners will be introduced to authentic, unedited Arabic language materials ranging from short stories, and poems, to newspaper articles dealing with social,  political,  and cultural issues. Emphasis will be on developing fluency in oral expression through discussions of issues presented in the reading and listening selections. There will be more focus on the development of native-like pronunciation and accurate use of grammatical structures than in the previous four courses. A primary objective of the course is the development of the writing skill through free composition exercises in topics of interest to individual students.  This course starts where ARAB 2202  leaves off and continues the development of the four language skills and grammar foundation using 18 themes, some new and some introduced in previous courses but are presented here at a more challenging level.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence have mastered over 3000 new words and will be able, within context of the 18 new and recycled themes to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations, 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, authentic, unedited passages of up to 400 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 300-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 2202 .  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Advanced Mid to the Superior level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.

  
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    ARAB 3206 - Intensive Arabic II


    (GB) Satisfies Option 1. (CU-ITL)     


    Fall. 12 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ARAB 1202  or permission of instructor.

    M. Younes.

    This immersion course covers the equivalent of ARAB 1203 - Intermediate Arabic I , ARAB 2202 - Intermediate Arabic II , and ARAB 3201 - Advanced Arabic I . We will continue to develop the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing through the extensive use of graded materials on a wide variety of topics (education, food, health, sports, religion, politics, economics, etc.).

    While more attention is given to developing native-like pronunciation and grammatical accuracy than in ARAB 1201  or ARAB 1202 , the main focus of the course will be on encouraging fluency and facility in understanding the language and communicating ideas in it both orally and in written form. Building on the foundation started in Elementary Arabic, the course will continue introducing Arab society, history, and culture. Oral and written expression will be developed through discussions of issues presented in the listening and reading selections, which will be followed by free composition exercises built around topics of interest to individual students.

    Upon completing the course students will be able to enroll in ARAB 3202 - Advanced Arabic II , regularly offered in the spring semester, or take content courses such as Modern Arabic Literature, Arab Society and Culture, and Current Events in the Arabic Media offered at Cornell or at Arabic-speaking academic institutions where Arabic is the language of instruction.

  
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    ARAB 3210 - [Arabic Grammar and Writing (in Arabic)]


    (GB) (LA-AS) Satisfies Option 1. (CU-ITL)     
    Spring. Not offered 2017-2018. 4 credits. Letter grades only.

    Prerequisite: ARAB 3202 .

    M. Younes.

    This course, taught entirely in Arabic, will focus on those aspects of Arabic grammar that are relevant for the correct reading and writing of Modern Standard Arabic such as the case and mood system (I’raab), the construct (IDaafa), the verb forms and their derivatives, different passive constructions, the number and gender systems, and different types of agreement. The readings will consist of a variety of texts (short stories, newspaper articles, poems, and biographies) which will be used as a basis for writing compositions.

 

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